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Crime falls in Chicago and DC after USSC strikes down gun bans - Media silent?

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by Little-Acorn, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. Little-Acorn

    Little-Acorn Well-Known Member

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    Somehow it's not surprising that crime rates are falling where laws have been changed to allow law-abiding people to own or carry their own weapons. In fact, it's happened again and again, most recently in Washington DC and Chicago where the Supreme Court struck down the almost-total gun bans in those cities in the last few years.

    Unfortunately, it's equally unsurprising that the mainstream media hasn't mentioned this major development in ANY of its outlets.

    An armed resident is a sovereign citizen. An unarmed resident is somewhere between a subject and a victim. Government finds it much easier to control the latter. And people who want govenment control, find they can promote their agenda much better by keeping the latter in that condition. Telling them there is a better way, does not fit with the program, does it?

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    http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2011...ening-about-important-gun-news/#ixzz1ZX35Pk3v

    Media Silence Is Deafening About Important Gun News

    By John Lott

    Published September 30, 2011

    Murder and violent crime rates were supposed to soar after the Supreme Court struck down gun control laws in Chicago and Washington, D.C.

    Politicians predicted disaster. "More handguns in the District of Columbia will only lead to more handgun violence," Washington’s Mayor Adrian Fenty warned the day the court made its decision.

    Chicago’s Mayor Daley predicted that we would "go back to the Old West, you have a gun and I have a gun and we'll settle it in the streets . . . ."

    The New York Times even editorialized this month about the Supreme Court's "unwise" decision that there is a right for people "to keep guns in the home."

    But Armageddon never happened. Newly released data for Chicago shows that, as in Washington, murder and gun crime rates didn't rise after the bans were eliminated -- they plummeted. They have fallen much more than the national crime rate.

    Not surprisingly, the national media have been completely silent about this news.

    One can only imagine the coverage if crime rates had risen. In the first six months of this year, there were 14% fewer murders in Chicago compared to the first six months of last year – back when owning handguns was illegal. It was the largest drop in Chicago’s murder rate since the handgun ban went into effect in 1982.

    Meanwhile, the other four most populous cities saw a total drop at the same time of only 6 percent.

    Similarly, in the year after the 2008 "Heller" decision, the murder rate fell two-and-a-half times faster in Washington than in the rest of the country.

    It also fell more than three as fast as in other cities that are close to Washington's size. And murders in Washington have continued to fall.

    If you compare the first six months of this year to the first six months of 2008, the same time immediately preceding the Supreme Court's late June "Heller" decision, murders have now fallen by thirty-four percent.

    Gun crimes also fell more than non-gun crimes.

    Robberies with guns fell by 25%, while robberies without guns have fallen by eight percent. Assaults with guns fell by 37%, while assaults without guns fell by 12%.

    Just as with right-to-carry laws, when law-abiding citizens have guns some criminals stop carrying theirs.

    The benefit could have been even greater. Getting a handgun permit in Chicago and Washington is an expensive and difficult process, meaning only the relatively wealthy go through it.

    Through the end of May only 2,144 people had handguns registered in Chicago. That limits the benefits from the Supreme Court decisions since it is the poor who are the most likely victims of crime and who benefit the most from being able to protect themselves.

    The biggest change for Washington was the Supreme Court striking down the law making it illegal to have a loaded gun. Over 70,000 people have permits for long guns that they can now legally used to protect themselves.


    (Full text of the article can be read at the above URL)
     
  2. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    how shocking that people get more law abiding when the risk of retaliation goes up.:D
     
  3. Pandora

    Pandora Well-Known Member

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    It can't be :) hehe
     
  4. Alias

    Alias Well-Known Member

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    Of course the liberal media is silent. This doesn't fit in the template. The corporate liberal media is pretty well corrupted in this country. That's why Fox is so popular and why a lot of people get their news from the internet instead of newspapers these days.
     
  5. pocketfullofshells

    pocketfullofshells Well-Known Member

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    Crime is down all over the place...
     
  6. Little-Acorn

    Little-Acorn Well-Known Member

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    Didn't even read the article, did we?
     
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