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Future Of Farming?

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Old_Trapper70, Sep 23, 2015.

  1. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Hydroponic farming uses 90% less water, does not pollute the soil, air, or water, and produces more in less space'

    http://www.popsci.com/farms-grow-up-thanks-to-technology

    Located 40 miles outside Chicago, this is Green Sense Farms, the largest indoor vertical farm in the U.S. The CEO of Green Sense, Colangelo grows produce—including micro-greens and basil—hydroponically, feeding them a constant stream of nutrient-rich water, in racks 25 feet high, beneath specialized LEDs, monitored by computer, and harvested as often as twice a week. “We can grow a large volume, in a small footprint, 365 days a year,” says Colangelo. “We’re not subject to rain or drought. We control the environment. So the weather is perfect every single day.”

    Indoor vertical farming has become a major player in the niche market of locally grown, high margin, perishable greens—such as kale, watercress, and lettuces. It eliminates the need for pesticides. It reduces the spoilage that occurs from trucking perishable produce 3,000 miles across the continent. It significantly cuts the carbon footprint of farm tractors and refrigerated trucks. And it meets the growing demand for fresh produce among middle-class urban dwellers.
     
  2. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes hydroponic has worked for the crops you note and has for quite some time.
    But note they specify "high margin" crops. The facilities are not cheap.
    And it won't work for all crops notably any below ground ones.
     
  3. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Actually, root crops, and even potatoes, can be grown hydroponically:

    http://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-hydroponic-root-crops-37413.html

    And as more technology advances, the costs are also declining.
     
  4. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    Didn't see taters mentioned. Not a root vegetable perhaps. There isn't much in the way of technology, lighting I guess.
    Can't harvest with your John Deer which makes it expensive on a large scale.
    Don't see this replacing much outside the high margon stuff. But I'll ask my farm family see what they think.
     
  5. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    http://www.ehow.com/how_7680517_grow-hydroponic-potatoes.html

    Harvest time is not the only time one uses a John Deere on the farm. Plowing , harrowing, ditching, etc., all add up. And you don't do such in Hydroponics. Then there is this:

    http://www.gardenguides.com/98252-advantages-hydroponics-over-conventional-farming.html
     
  6. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    You have prep as described in your root vegetable article.


    Thsee last four words are the other issue. Large scale production is expensive.
    Smaller footprint ? Sure.
    Problems inherent in nature ? Yes you negate them.
    Affordable food for hundreds of millions (or billions) ? Hmmmm.

    Ask yourself why it is that it's still not in large scale use after all these years. Hydroponics were popular when I was in high school. That's been a while.
     
  7. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Probably for a lot of the same reasons why solar, and wind, are slowly advancing. Do you think John Deere wants to see a loss of sales in their equipment? Think of how much the trucking industry would lose. Then there are the farmers living off the welfare of the Farm Bill.

    Like wind, and solar, it is slow growth, but growth just the same.

    http://manifestmind.com/hydroponics/
     
  8. Jason76

    Jason76 Active Member

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    I'm wondering if the argument for cheap food vs green expensive food is more important than a debate over green hosting. People can live without computers and hosting, but not food. Nonetheless, computers possibly run the organized systems which distribute food.

    Of course, some maniacs like Ted Turner want population reduction, obviously, because you can't have the green agenda with a large population.
     
  9. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Aside from greed, there is no reason why a large population cannot be supported by "green activities". It takes less land, and less water, to raise crops hydroponically then by using land. And once the system is set up crops can be grown year round. And there is no need for the "green" foods to be more expensive since the labor costs are deeply reduced. The ONLY reason "green" food is higher in costs now is simply the high demand, and the lack of production, giving excuse for greed.
     
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