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Guide to Islamophobia

Discussion in 'Culture & Religion' started by vyo476, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. vyo476

    vyo476 Active Member

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    According to a report published by the Runnymede Trust, the following eight perceptions are tied to Islamophobia:

    1. Islam is seen as a monolithic bloc, static and unresponsive to change.
    2. It is seen as separate and "other." It does not have values in common with other cultures, is not affected by them and does not influence them.
    3. It is seen as inferior to the West. It is seen as barbaric, irrational, primitive, and sexist.
    4. It is seen as violent, aggressive, threatening, supportive of terrorism, and engaged in a clash of civilizations.
    5. It is seen as a political ideology, used for political or military advantage.
    6. Criticisms made of "the West" by Muslims are rejected out of hand.
    7. Hostility towards Islam is used to justify discriminatory practices towards Muslims and exclusion of Muslims from mainstream society.
    8. Anti-Muslim hostility is seen as natural and normal.

    Please note that any of these eight, singular or in combination with others, are indicators of Islamophobia.

    Having spent almost a year on this forum, I've encountered numbers 1 through 6 in extreme abundance. Seven and eight are trickier; most people wouldn't admit to believing in them because that crosses a line that even the most ardent anti-PCers generally don't want to cross (Ann Coulter excluded). However, seven and eight are the logical conclusions of lines of reasoning that begin with numbers one through six, so they're just as pertinent here.
     
  2. BeatIt

    BeatIt New Member

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    i can't believe that people would actually have a phobia for it
     
  3. Atheist Woody

    Atheist Woody New Member

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    I dont have a phobia of Islam, I dont see them as inferior.

    I do however see the culture of Islam as one that does not integrate well with other cultures, especially ours in the west.

    Multiculturalism works where the cultures are at least similar to each other i.e American, Canadian, Australian, Western European are all fairly similar and someone could live in any of these places without too much change required on their behalf.

    Multicultralism is very dangerous when certain groups are mixed.

    You may call me a bigot, but I believe that Islam is as much as a threat to western way of life than nazism was in the 30s.
     
  4. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    Isn't this a description of the basis of the Iranian Government i.e. an Islamic Theocracy ruled by the leave of Islamic Clerics - law and policy being made with reference to theology!!??

    Oh yeah ....... not forgetting tah dah....Sepáh e Pásdárán e Enqeláb e Eslámi; literally: Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution - our good mates the Iranian Revolutionary Guards and not forgetting that Iran funds Hezbollah etc. etc. etc.

    Are the Iranians Islamaphobic :rolleyes:

    holly molly am I islamphobic for mentioning it :eek:
     
  5. Libsmasher

    Libsmasher New Member

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    NR on this looney, leftwing, anti-British organization (2000):

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1282/is_21_52/ai_66306889/pg_4
     
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