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Imus Suspended by MSNBC

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by vicki2, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. vicki2

    vicki2 New Member

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    Don Imus has been suspended from his morning talk show on MSNBC after he made a stupid and nasty racist remark last week. He spent this morning's show apologizing but it didn't work too well.

    I watch Imus not because I like him but I like his guests. He gets the best historians, politicos, etc. to phone in. He's a cranky old guy and what he said was very bad. That said, I'm rather surprised that NBC decided to can him for a while. There were protests and all the black leaders were up in arms, but he was being defended by the journalism establishment.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. berlinlife06

    berlinlife06 New Member

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    I don't like him at all! Never did. But I was not surprised that they only suspended him. They know the ratings Imus brings in, and they are not willing to lose that. Howard Stern has proven that Satellite radio can be the option for change, and they can't loose him too, even though they televise him.
     
  3. mtatum4496

    mtatum4496 New Member

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    Imus has a loyal fan base, so it was no suprise to me that they chose to suspend him rather than give into the demands for him to be fired. Personally, I don't listen to him, but he has been around for decades. Obviously, he connects with enough people to keep his career going.

    I have problems when the banner of journalistic integrity is raised in situations like this. With freedom of speech also comes accountability for what one chooses to say. Were his remarks made for any constructive reason whatsoever or made within a context to call attention to the sheer stupidity of using such verbiage? I do not believe they were and as such served no productive purpose at all.

    I don't have to like or agree with something said by a media person, but at least if I can see the reason behind the remarks, I can in good conscience support their right to make them. I do not see anything here that merits my support.
     
  4. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic New Member

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    I agree with mtatum. It was an exceptionally stupid thing to say, anyways, and he shoudl be more than just canned!
     
  5. mtatum4496

    mtatum4496 New Member

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    I noticed yesterday that the counter attack from some on the far right are saying that people who are up in arms about Imus' remarks should focus their energy on real problems in the black community and not waste time going after an obviously easy target. The funny thing is Rev. Al Sharpton was included, yet the man has logged a ton of miles and given his name and time to all sorts of projects that are working to accomplish those very goals.

    I don't see why this has to be an either/or situation. You can fight social ills and still demand that a media person be held accountable for his/her remarks. They are not mutually exclusive.
     
  6. mamab

    mamab New Member

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    Since I don't have tv at the moment, I don't have the foggiest idea what was said, or what the uproar is about. I guess I'll have to see if I can find out because now I'm curious. Guess there'll be a trip to MSNBC when I get off here. LOL
     
  7. vicki2

    vicki2 New Member

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    I'm sorry but I've lived in the New York area for too many years and heard too much rhetoric from Al Sharpton to take anything he spouts too seriously. He's a racial ambulance chaser and always has been ...it works for his ratings and he has a fan base too. Remember Twana Brawley and OJ Simpson? Look up Sharpton's opinions and spouts on those.

    Imus is a pain but his show is something of a salon for politicians and journalists and aside from Imus is a good place to hear a variety of opinions. That's more than I can say of Sharpton's show.
     
  8. mamab

    mamab New Member

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    Personally, I've never listened to anything the "Rev. Al Sharpton" has to say. I'm not racist, and really hate being thrown into that camp just because I'm white and I don't agree with affirmative action.

    In regard to Imus, from what I've read, he's been fired. I don't listen to him, either, so it won't affect me.
     
  9. vicki2

    vicki2 New Member

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    Shaprton should be fired too lol. I really think the dialogue on this incident will go on for quite some time, and am not so sure the outcome will be a positive one either. The hip hop world where such remarks originate won't budge which will just piss off middle America (blacks included) even more.
     
  10. mamab

    mamab New Member

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    That's the thing I don't understand. Blacks will call themselves MUCH WORSE names than what I'm sure Imus used, but that doesn't seem to matter. If it's derogatory for one, it's derogatory for all. NO ONE should use those terms. At least, that's my take on it. Anyone is welcome to disagree.
     
  11. mtatum4496

    mtatum4496 New Member

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    Oh, I very much agree that the good Rev. Sharpton has on a ton of occasions weighed in on matters before all the facts were in. For recent events, his open condemnation of the college soccer players that were indicted for raping the stripper at a party - and who have since been cleared - is one example. I have not seen any retractions from Sharpton about his ill fated statements. Instead there was radio silence.

    At the same time, I cannot overlook the fact that he has lent his name and his money to a number of groups across the country that are addressing the problems of prenancy, unemployment and other social ills among the black community by social responsibility.

    That Sharpton is a publicity hound that flies off the handle, IMO, does not negate the fact of Imus saying something that did not have to be said. Further, I think the decision to fire Imus all boiled down to money. The sponsors walked and the knee jerk reaction was to let him go. If the sponsors had held firm, I doubt he would have had more than the suspension.

    Unfortunately, that is not the way it is, mamab. I worked in textiles for twelve years, with a predominanly African American work force. While it was considered just fine for any one in there to describe others of their race by such terms as being ligh-skinned to coffee to dark chocolate and even up to and including the "n" word, it was not understood to have the same meaning as if someone of a different race used the same terms. To give my former co-workers credit, I never heard any of them refer to a white person as anything but "white" - no honky, no paleface.

    I would equate it to the way that other sectors of society may take pokes at others in their group, but close ranks when someone outside the group does the same thing. Catholics and Mormons come to mind, in that both groups may criticize or make fun of themselves internally, but the same verbiage employed by someone outside the religions will result immediately in the ranks being closed.
     
  12. vicki2

    vicki2 New Member

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    I think the networks will look idiotic by the time this whole thing plays itself out ...which isn't going to be soon either. If an apology can't be accepted then what did they want ...the death penalty for something they say to each other every day?

    It wasn't Imus who made 'nappy headed ho' a mainstream phrase. It was all the networks who said it repeatedly last week, and the newspaper who printed it on their front pages.
     
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