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Iraqi power grid nearing collapse

Discussion in 'World Politics' started by Truth-Bringer, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. Truth-Bringer

    Truth-Bringer New Member

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    Iraqi power grid nearing collapse

    "The shortages across the country are the worst since the summer of 2003, shortly after the U.S.-led invasion to topple Saddam Hussein."

    Mission accomplished!

    Rest of article here
     
  2. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    You didn't mention that the stress on the grid is due to an incredible number of people sudenly being able to purchase conveniences that require electricity. The grid is being stressed due to prosperity.
     
  3. Truth-Bringer

    Truth-Bringer New Member

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    ROTFL. Yeah, like the 4 hour lines for gas are due to prosperity... Guess again:

    http://www.mises.org/story/2026
     
  4. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    Lots of new cars on the road there as well. Their infrastructure wasn't designed to handle the new demands. Face it, entrepeneurship and consumption are going through the roof and taxing their systems far beyond anything experienced with saddam in power.
     
  5. vyo476

    vyo476 Active Member

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    Great, so their infrastructure is a mess. Whose fault is that? Either ours or Al Maliki's government's, and either way the fault can be traced back to us.

    But whatever. Growing pains are growing pains and they don't really matter so much in the face of an insurgency that's turned the capital city into a constant battleground.

    But hey - at least there's that one part of Iraq that's really, completely benefited from our presence. I am, of course, referring to Kurdistan. Check this **** out: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/02/16/60minutes/main2486679.shtml

    That's prosperity.
     
  6. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    The "mess" is a result of a growing economy. You want to blame us for that? Go ahead.

    The truth is that most of Iraq is growing and flourishing. 90% of the violence is within a 50 mile radius of Baghdad in a nation the size of California. Progress is being made as much as the left hates it.
     
  7. Coyote

    Coyote Active Member

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    Coyote died for your sheep
    oops...
     
  8. vyo476

    vyo476 Active Member

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    Go back and read again. "Growing pains are growing pains..."

    You have this knack for only reading the parts of my posts you want to disagree with.
     
  9. Truth-Bringer

    Truth-Bringer New Member

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    Produce and present evidence there are more cars on the road now than there were in 2002. Who's driving these cars?...since it appears many Iraqis have left:


    War in Iraq Spurs Massive Migration



    "Nearly 2 million Iraqis -- about 8 percent of the prewar population -- have embarked on a desperate migration, mostly to Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, according to the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees."

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16967176

    Professionals Fleeing Iraq As Violence, Threats Persist

    Exodus of Educated Elite Puts Rebuilding at Risk


    By Doug Struck
    Washington Post Foreign Service
    Monday, January 23, 2006; Page A01

    BAGHDAD -- The office of Iraq's most eminent cardiologist is padlocked. A handwritten sign is taped on his wooden door in the private clinic in Baghdad: Patients of Dr. Omar Kubasi should call him in Amman, Jordan.

    There, Kubasi, 63, spends his days sitting at a cafe with other physicians and professionals from Iraq. Frustrated, he watches from afar as the medical education system he helped set up during his 36-year career slowly disintegrates. His teaching doctors are fleeing the country in fear. Younger physicians are looking for other countries to train in. Even patients are leaving, no longer confident in the care they can get in Iraq.

    "I think it's part of the plan for the country's destruction," Kubasi said by telephone. "The situation in the last six months has gotten so bad, we couldn't continue."

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/22/AR2006012201112.html


    Doctors Under Fire in Iraq


    by Aaron Glantz with Salam Talib

    Until two weeks ago, Ali Falah worked as an emergency room doctor in the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk. The city, which is ethnically mixed but dominated by two Kurdish militias, has been the scene of increased sectarian violence. Most doctors left the city earlier this year after one physician was gunned down inside the emergency room.

    Falah says lately he's often been the only doctor on the floor of an emergency room that receives 80 patients a day. Falah says he was ready to hang on and continue working, but two weeks ago someone dropped a note off at his home in a Shi'ite section of Kirkuk.

    "They threw a letter in the house saying the residents who are Shia have to leave the city," he says. "Otherwise, they said, 'What will happen, will happen.' So most of the people left. Me also."

    Falah says that was the last straw. He left for the southern province of Amara, where he's living near his fiancée's family. He's given up medicine, saying it's too dangerous, and is working for a company. He won't say which type.

    http://www.antiwar.com/glantz/?articleid=9719


    Doctors Fleeing Iraq


    Associated Press | November 22, 2006

    VIENNA, Austria - Iraq's top doctors are under threat and are fleeing the country, leaving hospitals in the hands of medical students or junior physicians, an Iraqi lawmaker said Wednesday.

    Doctors have been kidnapped and killed since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 that toppled ex-Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, said Dr. Rajaa al-Khuzai, an obstetrician who is an elected member of the Iraqi National Council.

    "They have been targeted since the fall of the regime," she told The Associated Press during a visit to Austria. "Some of them have been kidnapped and found dead in the streets, some have been released after paying a ransom."

    She also told reporters earlier Wednesday that Iraqi hospitals face a shortage of medicines and are in dire need of new equipment.

    "We were promised, or we believed, that we would have many new hospitals being built, and many health centers ... but none of this has been done," she said. "No hospitals have been built so far; only some of the hospitals have been serviced."

    "So if you want to see a good ophthalmologist in Baghdad, you'll never find one. If you want a good gynecologist ... you'll never find one," she said. "The health services are very bad."

    http://www.military.com/NewsContent/0,13319,119420,00.html?ESRC=iraq.RSS
     
  10. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    Your reasoning is faulty. Do believe that because some people are leaving the country that those who remain who didn't own cars are unable to buy them. If two million people left california, do you believe that it's energy demand could not increase? Two million people is a drop in the bucket for both california and iraq.

    http://www.defenselink.mil/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=27555

    Clip:

    Senor cited a number of causes to the gasoline shortage, which has made for long gas lines at neighborhood stations throughout the country. He said prosperity is one reason. There are 250,000 more cars in Iraq since the fall of Saddam, he said, and the increase in demand is one reason for the shortage.


    Your articles are typically irrelavent to the facts. The fact is that the infrastructure in iraq is not equipped for the growth that the country is experiencing. More cars, more electrical conveniences, more computers, more televisions, more media outlets etc., etc., etc. Prosperity is taxing their energy supply.
     
  11. Truth-Bringer

    Truth-Bringer New Member

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  12. USMC the Almighty

    USMC the Almighty New Member

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    That's week, Truth. You can't refute the substance so you attack the messenger. Who else would keep statistics on this? No one else leaves the GZ.
     
  13. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    Your complaint is a fallacious circumstantial ad homenim since the source has nothing at all to do with the truth or untruth of the story. Nice try though.
     
  14. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    You expected something else?
     
  15. Truth-Bringer

    Truth-Bringer New Member

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    What substance is their to refute? Where did they get their statistics? Where is the proof? It's not there. You have to take the source's word for it, and the fact is, THEY'RE BIASED.
     
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