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Obamacare--Here's What You Can Expect

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by Johnny Tremain, Nov 17, 2012.

  1. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend in Canada who developed breast cancer--she lives near Winnipeg, she and her husband teach at a university in that area. They told her she needed to wait 10-18 months before any surgery was possible. Being smart folks, they went down to Minneapolis--to save her life.

    Here is another example of socialized medicine--that everyone thinks is marvelous.
    YES FOLKS--this does happen.
    ALL THE TIME!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...l-sent-home-wait-operation.html#ixzz2COXSILES
     
  2. Cruella

    Cruella Well-Known Member

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    I read those stories all the time. In both Canada and Britain where they have no beds, and one patient died of thirst and they weren't even trying to kill him that way on purpose.
     
  3. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    It is a problem of bureaucracy--not of good will.
    Imagine shopping for groceries at the DMV.

    If the government runs it--or touches it too deeply--it WILL turn into shit.
    Guaranteed.
     
  4. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    Well, my nephew and his wife live near Quebec and my niece in law was diagnosed through a routine mammogram (free) with stage 2 breast cancer after a (free) biopsy was made (within a week of the mammogram) to remove and analyze the small lump found in her breast by the mammogram.

    A week later she unerwent the first lumpectomy (free) that removed the lump the analyzis of the tissue removed. This analysis (free) showed that the margin around the incision was not wide enough to assure that all the cancerous tissues had been removed, so a second lumpectomy to remove more tissue and to remove most of the lymph nodes under her left arm was schedule for. . .the following week. Luckily, none of the lymphnodes removed showed that the cancer had spread.

    She then was advice that, as a matter of precaution, she should undergoe chemo therapy and Radiation treatment. However, she refused the chemotherapy, and her oncologist accepted that decision due to the fact that the lymph nodes didn't show that the cancer had spread, but insisted on her having 45 days of daily radiation. She began radiation treatments (free) EXACTLY 32 days after her first mammogram.

    This happened 5 years ago. The cancer has not returned.

    I think that, once again, it is funny how you guys "poopooed" the article about the young woman in Ireland who lost her life because she was refused an abortion as "an unfortunate accident that happened in ONE specific hospital and cannot possibly be the norm!"

    Yet, you do not hesitate to post "unfortunate accidents that happened in ONE specific hospital" in a case (the child with the pencil stuck in his hand) where, although terribly uncomfortable and sad, was OBVIOUSLY NOT a case of life and death. . .and was corrected by travelling 20 miles to another hospital ran by the SAME National health system.

    Double standards to prove your point?

    I have family living in Canada (Quebec), Australia, France, Belgium, and Italy. I have close friends living in Portugal, and I have lived for 4 years (while raising my children) in England. I am intimately familiar with ALL the systems of health care in each one of those countries, and those "legends" of long waiting line are EXTREMELY overstated.

    Certainly not more common than my own story right here in the US.
    I was involved in an accident (as a passenger) and my left clavicle had a severely displaced fracture. Since it happened on July 3, 2011, I was told in the emergency room that I would require surgery to set the bone with a metal plate, and that the orthopedic surgeon would make a "special" effort to see me as soon as he came back from his 4th of July break. . .on July 6th, 2011. Then, the surgery was schedule for July 10, 2011. . .while I returned to my hotel (we were travelling in Colorado, away from my home) with the two pieces of bone clicking against each other for 7 days.

    The surgery went well enough. . . but was not done properly, so that one of the screw that held the plate to the clavicle was inserted at the exact place where the bone had been crushed. . .so it actually didn't hold and broke the bone even more about 4 days after the surgery. By then, I was on my way back to South Carolina, and it "ONLY" took me 3 weeks to get an appointment with another Orthopedic surgeon in my city. . .who at first didn't want to take my case, since he had not done the first bloached surgery. After some pleading from my family physician, the Orthopedist agreed to reconsider, and the second surgery was scheduled for September 7, almost TWO months after the accident.

    After over a year with that plate in my shoulder, the orthopedic surgeon decided it would be safe to remove the plate. This was done on November 2, 2012. The bone broke again the next day, and I am due to see the Orthopedist surgeon again to "see what can be done" on November 27, 2012.

    EVERYONE can find a story of long delays in obtaining proper care.

    The difference between other, more universal, system of health care is that EVERYONE can obtain care, and that the waiting time is not set by "who can pay," but by the emergency of the injury or illness. And that, because access to preventive health care is free and easily accessible, many of the most deadly disease are diagnosed BEFORE it is too late to be treated.
     
  5. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    Sure. . .because you find many elderly people who complain about their medicare coverage, right?

    Or because veterans hate their coverage, right?

    Imagine shopping for groceries at Neiman Marcus!
     
  6. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    The poor received care here before Obamacare.
    Do you know of any poor who were turned away at hospitals?
    Were people dying in the streets?
    Why do Mexicans drive into San Diego from Tijuana with a laboring pregnant woman and dump her at a 7-11?

    Sorry about your injuries.
    Hope you get the problem solved.
     
  7. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    You know, this is kind of boring. Every three months or so a new ignorant person arrives in this forum and makes the same stupid claims about "the poor doesn't get turned away at hospitals!"

    This has been debunked several times. . . obviously not to the satisfaction of the worse Right wing extremists, but to that of REASONABLE people.

    Before Obamacare, the poor ONLY got treatment if they were disabled enough or poor enough to qualify for Medicaid. .which by the way is ALSO a government program. . .

    Otherwise, the poor could ONLY get treatment in an emergency room. . .which OBVIOUSLY cost 10 times more than a visit to a clinic! The poor and uninsured middle class also WAITED until an ailment was too severe to ignore any longer before going to the emergency room. . .so many "simple" ailments that could have been treated early by a simple visit to a generalist and an antibiotic shot or prescription turned out to be MAJOR medical problems (i.e., a simple urinary tract infection undiagnosed or left untreated can "appear" to disappear, but reappear in a much more dangerous and harder to treat form of KIDNEY infection, that may even lead to kidney failure).

    Also, when it is true that emergency rooms (at least those who receive funding from the government, including medicare and medicaid) cannot refuse STABILIZATION treatment, they do NOT HAVE TO DO ANY follow up or engage in tests to determine what the full impact of the ailment is. So, the emergency rooms often become a revolving door, with SEVERELY sick patients who do not have insurance coverage are being "stabilized" (but not treated) MANY more times than a proper treatment would require.

    Also, even with the EMTALA regulations, there continue to be very disgusting behavior by hospital (including several big, well known CHRISTIAN hospitals) who continue to practice "patient dumping" with the most disenfranchised and needy patients. And although there is a law against "patient dumping," the fines that those hospital risk to have to pay if their disgusting practice is discovered are so much less than the cost of caring for those patients who have no means of paying that they continue the risky practice.

    Another aspect of this shortsighted comment you make about "poor people are cared for by hospital even before Obamacare" is that, EVEN IF the EMTALA law were working perfectly (which, as I show above, it isn't) THE TAX PAYER STILL PAY FOR IT, just in a more hypocritical and unpractical fashion. Obviously the cost of caring for those uninsured patients has to be distributed on those who ARE insured. . . and this raises the cost of everyone going to the hospital, and the cost of insurance premiums.

     
  8. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    An Obama-bot.
    I had tried not to think this.
    Proof positive here.

    Hope the foam from your rant did not stain your house-dress.
     
  9. Cruella

    Cruella Well-Known Member

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    The Emergency Medical and Treatment Labor Act (EMTLA)

    Public and private hospitals alike are prohibited by law from denying a patient care in an emergency. The Emergency Medical and Treatment Labor Act (EMTLA) passed by Congress in 1986 explicitly forbids the denial of care to indigent or uninsured patients based on a lack of ability to pay. It also prohibits unnecessary transfers while care is being administered and prohibits the suspension of care once it is initiated, provisions that prevent dumping patients who cannot pay on other hospitals. The treatment of indigent and uninsured patients is a huge financial drain upon the health system, especially in areas where no public hospitals are available.


    CBO Raises Estimate Of Number Of Americans Who Will Be Uninsured ...

    Congress‘ official scorekeeper said Wednesday that 30 million people will be uninsured when President Obama’s health care law goes fully into effect, including six million Americans who are expected to pay a tax penalty — about two million more than originally forecast when the law was passed in 2010.
     
  10. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    Funny how you have nothing to reply or contradict this expose than venom and bile!
    I love it! ;)
     
  11. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    Dear, if you had read my entire post. . .this is EXACTLY what I posted, INCLUDING a link to EMTLA and a description of how well (or not) this act is performing, and the reasons why.

    And, I also covered the "COST on EVERYONE" of the treatment of uninsured.

    Obviously, you have such little regard for anything or anyone that doesn't fall into your paradigm of beliefs, that you don't even bother to read a post before opening your mouth and flapping your gums!

    Not the most definite sign of intelligence and fairness!
     
  12. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    Ummm-hmmm.
     
  13. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    you should, you employ it often enough.
     
  14. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    so lets check the scoreboard...

    Johnny and I both know Canadians who were ill served by cannuckcare (my fried died as she could not afford to do it herself. Op knows one that did not.

    OP points to a patient with an excellent case for malpractice in Ireland and here in her personal experience. one was "free", one was not. but of course the one wsa hardly free as it just got paid for by taxes.

    lets hope OP takes the opportunity to speak with a lawyer and her care will end up being free as well. still dont see how there was only one (incompetent) ortho guy available. had to be in the middle of nowhere.
     
  15. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    I must say that Georgia and South Carolina, as typical Red States do seem like the middle of nowhere, although the Medical College of Georgia is supposed to be one of the best in the US. . .say the red necks!

    Oh. . a little update! My husband had a second stroke just 3 weeks ago. He obviously needs to see a neurologist to try to find out what provokes those stroke and the damage done to his brain, as well as a way to maybe prevent further strokes and further damage.

    We have been waiting for a referral to the neurologist. It arrived this afternoon. The appointment to SEE this neurologist is scheduled for THE END OF JANUARY 2013!

    Let see. . .how many strokes can one have in 3 months?
     
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