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Pres. Musharraf to resign

Discussion in 'Middle Eastern Politics' started by Shadow, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. Shadow

    Shadow New Member

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    Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf says in an address before the nation that he will resign.
     
  2. top gun

    top gun New Member

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    Yes I found that very interesting myself. I wasn't sure the people in Pakistan had enough clout to remove someone so entrenched. Especially after he had a one time already went the Marshal Law route.

    Do you think the Butto assassination was the straw that broke the camels back and it was just a matter of time? Or do you think it was the fact that a fairly large faction continue to support the Taliban?

    Or both...
     
  3. pocketfullofshells

    pocketfullofshells Well-Known Member

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    It was a matter of time, Her Assaination just sparked it more...but her being live could have done it sooner even so its hard to say. And as far as Taliban support I think its less support for the Taliban and more anger at Musharraf that the Taliban was able to lean on...without him they would actuly lose power as they will not have him to rally people against.
     
  4. Shadow

    Shadow New Member

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    hi TopGun.

    I think it was probably a combination of a number of things. Seems these events are never all that simple ;) The assassination was probably a "critical factor" in this.~ if not the defining factor.

    gosh, the world stage of leaders is undergoing some major changes .........Sure hope it will be for a better, and more peaceful/ cooperative world.
     
  5. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    Interesting situation.....I was just thinking about some potential outcomes.

    If they charge him which I reckon Nawaz Sharief will opt for they'll want to hang him....most in positions of power want him out of the way but if they try and hang him then I reckon the Military will rise up in support of him and the whole thing will start again!

    Exile is difficult as the US and UK don't want him although I reckon the US should extend an olive branch. My bets on Saudi! Although they will view him as too much of a security risk I reckon he'll end up there, Prince Muqrin bin Abdul Aziz (the Saudi Intel supremo) visited Pakistan two days ago so conicidences aside I think the Saudi Royal family is extending an invitation........watch this space.

    As for the future...well turmoil is my bet whilst the conflicting political factions vie for leverage, Zardari and Sharief will want their guys installed or even themselves! Whichever happens the extremeist will have time to operate without restriction so it could get dodgy. And to cap it all I just wonder how much authority a civil government will have over the Pakistani Army and the ISI as Musharraf has many close friends and a truck load of influence in both organisations!
     
  6. BigRob

    BigRob Well-Known Member

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    This is not really shocking. It has been seen to be coming for awhile now. He stepped down as the de-facto dictator (under US pressure) and then lost in elections. His party does not control the government now, and under impeachment threats he has no choice but to resign. He will probably go into exile.
     
  7. top gun

    top gun New Member

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    Interesting point of view on the Taliban. I never thought of it in just that that way. I hope you are right. A weaker Taliban is always a good thing.
     
  8. top gun

    top gun New Member

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    Musharraf was one of those leaders I never really knew if we could trust. Always wondered if he was playing both sides of the fence to keep a larger conflict from occurring or he was just playing one side against the other for more American cash.

    It will be interesting to see what happens next. I certainly share your hope for peace.:)
     
  9. Shadow

    Shadow New Member

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    ~ Top Gun


    Interesting. Same feeling I have had about him. I have no proof or even an article to support it....... just a gut thing. ( I know,.........it doesn't really wash in politics. ;)
     
  10. Libsmasher

    Libsmasher New Member

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    That's nonsense. ;)
     
  11. Shadow

    Shadow New Member

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    President Musharraf’s departure will leave future anti-terrorism policy uncertain

    Zahid Hussain in Islamabad

    President Musharraf’s resignation has serious repercussions for the US-led War on Terror.

    Although he had been sidelined by the Pakistani Army for quite some time before his resignation, the President remained actively involved in running the country's counter-terrorism policy with the military and was still a valuable ally for the United States.

    A lynchpin of his country's alliance with the West, Mr Musharraf departure has come at a crucial moment in the battle against al-Qaeda and Taleban insurgents in the region.
    As he announced his resignation, thousands of Pakistani troops were engaged in fighting Islamist militants who now effectively control the country's lawless tribal region and large swath of North West Frontier Province.

    It was, therefore, not surprising that news of Mr Musharraf’s resignation was greeted with glee by Islamist militants fighting in the region.


    The West will hope that the President's resignation does not weaken Pakistan in its battle with worldwide extremists. For almost nine years, the former military commander had provided the divided country with strong - if highly controversial - leadership. After the September 11 attacks, he built a new alliance with the United States, making Pakistan a crucial cog in the so-called War on Terror. Crucially, he abandoned his government’s long standing support for the Taleban government in Afghanistan, which led to its quick fall at the hands of US-led coalition forces.

    In the months and years after September 11, Mr Musharraf's government had a crucial role in fighting al-Qaeda. His forces captured more than 600 Islamist activists, including leaders like Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and Ramzi bin al-Shibh, two alleged masterminds of September 11. Mr Musharraf also banned Islamic militant groups which had once been patronised by Pakistani military intelligence.

    The arrests and crackdowns on Islamist groups almost cost Mr Musharraf his life. He narrowly escaped two assassination attempts in 2003 involving al-Qaeda backed Islamic militants.

    His political exit robs the West of a stalwart ally who echoed its concerns about how Islamic militancy is destabilising Afghanistan and Pakistan, where al-Qaeda and the Taleban have regained strength. It is from the Pakistani tribal areas, the US and Britain say, that Taleban fighters cross into Afghanistan where they present a real danger to Nato forces.

    Today's development may result in further fragmentation of power, which had started after February's parliamentary elections. Following those polls, the country is now ruled by coalition government whose future is uncertain and whose ability to combat extremism in the tribal areas is untested. Nobody yet knows who the next president will be. Led by the Pakistan People’s Party, the civilian government has failed to provide any indication of its foreign policy, leaving its final decision to the military. There is no agreement in the ruling alliance on how to counter militancy and extremism.

    While the Pakistan People’s Party, which is the senior partner in the four-party coalition, favours continuing Mr Musharraf’s policy of cooperation with the United States, the Pakistan Muslim League (N), led Nawaz Sharif, wants to review this. However, some analysts believe an elected civilian government could, in fact, provide a surer basis for future action than the weakened Mr Musharraf.

    A great deal also depends, as always in Pakistan, on the will of the military. The West is believed to be satisfied that the Army chief, General Ashfaq Kayani, is fully committed to following his predecessor’s policy. However, it still faces a huge task in the border regions. The future for Pakistan is, thus, uncertain.

    source:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article4558639.ece
     
  12. top gun

    top gun New Member

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    Well that's two completely different things I posted as possibilities sooooooo which one is the "nonsense".

    Or do you believe Musharraf was just an excellent Alli? If you believe that, that's fine.

    I just alway read him as being in the middle between the US and the radical element in his country and was asking others opinions on why they thought that was... if they thought that was.

    I'm more than glad to listen to your take on it as well...
     
  13. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    ....if I may Sir, for what its worth I would tend to agree with you.

    Despite jubilation in Pakistan I think Musharraf was a positive influence on the country taken over his period in power especially prior to 9/11. His concentration on increasing the profile of the economy, education as well as their oversees image should be viewed in positive terms comparative to that of the Bhutto feudal dynasty perhaps?

    From 9/11 he has been treading some pretty hazardous paths, juggling the interests of TWOT Alliances against domestic extremists and internal political dissent over regional political and religious factionalisation; on the whole I think he handled these as best as could be expected!
     
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