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Racoon poop...don't touch that!!!

Discussion in 'Health' started by ASPCA4EVER, May 5, 2009.

  1. ASPCA4EVER

    ASPCA4EVER New Member

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    Rare raccoon roundworm blinds NYC teen

    Disease transmitted through contact with animal's feces, officials warnupdated
    3:33 p.m. CT, Mon., May 4, 2009

    NEW YORK - A rare disease transmitted through contact with raccoon feces has left a New York City teenager blind in one eye and an infant brain damaged.
    The city's Department of Health warns parents to be on the alert for raccoon roundworm, which can cause nausea, nerve damage and even death. It says fewer than 30 cases have been reported in medical literature.
    Health department spokeswoman Sally Slavinski says parents should supervise children to keep them from eating raccoon feces. Droppings should be picked up using gloves and disposable bags and put in the trash.
    The worms lay eggs in the feces; they hatch after being ingested and travel through the body. The teenager lost sight in one eye in January. The infant has been hospitalized since suffering seizures and spinal problems last October. They're from Brooklyn.


    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30558815/


    ********************************************

    There have been only 30 some cases reported since medical records have been kept...this is a real 'NASTY' one 4 sure!!! :(
     
  2. samsara15

    samsara15 Member

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    Yeech! Our raccoon population around here has declined since rabies made a run through the raccoon population many years ago, but we do have a lot of deer poop around.
     
  3. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Parents have to be told not to let their kids eat sh****!?!?

    What has the world come to, anyway?
     
  4. ASPCA4EVER

    ASPCA4EVER New Member

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    No-No-No...all you have to do is touch it with your bare hands...ya, know kinda of like an inquisitive toddler would do...JEEZ PEOPLE :eek:

    I truly doubt that parents are allowing their children to go out and 'graze/snack/eat/nibble upon fecal matter'...LMAO
     
  5. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Let's hope not. Let's also hope that parents don't have to be told not to let toddlers play in the garbage.
     
  6. dahermit

    dahermit New Member

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    There is a population explosion of raccoons, most likely due to the fact that well-meaning but stupid person's anti-fur actions destroyed the wild fur market. Trappers have stopped trapping them resulting in the current over-population of the troublesome eating machines.
    It has become almost impossible to raise sweet corn where I live in Michigan. Also, my entire chicken flock was devastated to the point where I gave up on that enterprise.
    Each year, in order to protect my nesting geese's eggs, I illegally trap, poison, and shoot at least eight raccoons each spring (now).
    The 'coons are thrown into a pit and left to rot because they have no value, whereas if the fur prices were not depressed, and they were taken in the fall by a trapper, they would be a resource (I once received $45.00 for a single large hide in about 1976 when trapping was more lucrative).
    You people who participated in anti-fur activities are responsible. I want you to send me compensation for the eggs I do not get from my no-longer existent home flock of chickens and the wasted money and energy it cost me in attempts to raise sweet corn, and the goose eggs destroyed by coons. Will that be cash or check?
     
  7. ASPCA4EVER

    ASPCA4EVER New Member

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    Down here from you in Kansas...the 'PETA' nut jobs have gone after the coon hunters and since a large part of Kansas plains/flint hills big blue stem prairie is being purchased by the 'snob society' groups for hysterical preservation it's getting harder and harder to find places to raise and train good hunting mules and coon dogs. And we've had quite a few 'rabid raccoon' wandering around small rural towns in the light of day...

    I used to believe in 'PETA' but now I'm afraid that they've just taken a good thing and became fixated about everything and the balance of mother nature has been thrown to the wind once again!
     
  8. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Fur trapping in New York City, now there's an unusual occupation. I wonder if it would pay?

    How much for a rat pelt?
     
  9. dahermit

    dahermit New Member

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    The anti-fur movement was not a local endeavor, it was a national movement that resulted in a population explosion in almost all the states. The problem with raccoons in New York is not limited to New York...that is just where it made the news.
    Also, fur trapping is not a full time occupation. The people who trapped were from many low-paying occupations that supplemented their incomes with the very hard work of trapping.
    They performed a service by removing excess raccoons from the environment that were formerly controlled by predators that no longer exist in proximity to human habitation (wolves, cougars, bears).
     
  10. dahermit

    dahermit New Member

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    Now PLC1, if you would like to engage in a discussion on the effects of the anti-fur movement upon the environment, health, economy, I (and others)am at your disposal.
     
  11. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    The point I was making is that the OP was about a disease being spread by raccoons in New York City.

    It seems to me that the controversy over fur trapping is irrelevant to raccoons in NYC, unless there is a possibility of fur trapping there.

    Can you imagine raccoon traps being set in the middle of the city, opposition to fur trapping or not?

    I'm not trying to make a case against fur trapping, and certainly not for emotionalism over scientific game management, just engaging in a little sarcasm and humor.

    Now about that trap line on Madison Avenue, would people please refrain from driving and stepping on my traps? I'm trying to earn a few extra dollars there.
     
  12. dahermit

    dahermit New Member

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    When an animal density(raccoons) increases, the animals will move into areas of less density. When trapping of raccoons in areas surrounding NYC stopped and the density increased, raccoons (as well as other animals such as coyotes) spread into other areas (NYC).
    Coons in the city could be trapped by putting the traps in the alleys where the food that attracts them is located. Most people would not be aware that the traps were there. However, if the raccoon population was controlled in the areas surrounding NYC, the problem would not likely manifest itself there.
     
  13. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    That does make sense, I have to admit. It does seem silly, advocating trap lines in NYC, but, sure, animals will move in to human habitations when their numbers aren't controlled.

    Here, we have coyotes practically in town, and far more mountain lions than most people realize. They haven't caused many problems so far, but a coyote disease would definitely get people's attention.

    And yes, there are too many people who are unfamiliar with wildlife and who tend to think of cute little furry critters as pets, rather than wild animals.
     
  14. ASPCA4EVER

    ASPCA4EVER New Member

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    And as urban blight continues to spread and the little mom & pop farms disappear then the food source for the raccoons become the fringes of cities and the trash cans and urban area gardens...their not stupid little 'masked bandits' they are extremely adaptable and cunning!
     
  15. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Coyotes and black bears are pretty smart and adaptable, too, and are often a lot closer to town than people realize.

    Mountain lions aren't quite so adaptable, but they are intelligent creatures, too, and are likely to be found wherever there are enough deer to keep them happy. If deer get scarce, there's Fido.
     

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