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Supreme Courts Approves Rule To Expand FBI's Hacking Power

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by Reddie, May 1, 2016.

  1. Reddie

    Reddie Well-Known Member

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    Despite opposition from civil liberties groups, the Supreme Court on Thursday approved a rule change that . . .

    Great. Things keep keep getting better and better. The changes take effect in December.

    Just curious, would you feel safer if the FBI is able to hack any computer or electronic device?
     
  2. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    You think they can't now ?
    No, no safer. But I've assumed they could and did for years.
     
  3. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    The key word was to "expand" the FBI's hacking powers. Prior to this ruling their power to hack was limited:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36169019

    The US Supreme Court has approved a rule change that could allow law enforcement to remotely search computers around the world.

    Previously, magistrate judges could order searches only within the jurisdiction of their court, often limited to a few counties.

    The US Department of Justice (DoJ) said the change was necessary to modernise the law for the digital age.

    But digital rights groups say the move expands the FBI's hacking authority.

    The DoJ wants judges to be able to issue remote search warrants for computers located anywhere that the United States claims jurisdiction, which could include other countries.

    A remote search typically involves trying to access a suspect's computer over the internet to explore the data contained on it.

    It has pushed for a change in the rules since 2013, arguing that criminals can mask their location and identity online making it difficult to determine which jurisdiction a computer is located in.
     
  4. Zanna

    Zanna Well-Known Member

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    I think it makes sense that they used the know-how of hacking for their own operations as soon as it was available to them...so basicaly with the first public sprouting of the internet.
    If it helps them do their job better they would use anything.
    It's just that now this ruling is depriving people from their right to privacy.
     
  5. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    What the ruling did was to expand the power to hack from a local jurisdiction to an international jurisdiction. It didn't change their "right" to hack, just the distance they could use that power.
     
  6. Zanna

    Zanna Well-Known Member

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    ...Ok, that's even worse that what I thought it was all about. Isn't that a matter of international diplomacy though?
    Since when is it ok for the agency of one country to fiddle with the private affairs of other countries' citizens? I get the paranoia behind all this, but I don't think the US would ever accept something like this ever happening the other way around, as having another country expand their intel tentacles on them.
    Diplomaticaly speaking this is a very bold and intrusive move.
     
  7. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    When those foreign citizens use the internet, or some other form of communication, to hack into our systems, or support activities to terrorize us. Just a couple of examples.
     
  8. Zanna

    Zanna Well-Known Member

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    I won't deny that those are very real possibilities. I know the dangers of the internet all too well.
    But consider this:
    US citizens can also do the same internet crimes, etc to individuals, corporations and state organization, that exist in domains that belong outside of US borders. So shouldn't those other countries defend their own citizens' integrity and safety by hacking global computers (the way the corresponding US bureau now wishes to do)?
    It's a two way street.
    Does this one sided action from US bureaus of investigation seem diplomaticaly right to you? If we need global security so much, why not create a separate bureau by the United Nations to do those things impartialy and without everyone having to fear each individual country's agenda?
     
  9. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Do you seriously think China, Russia, etc., are NOT hacking into our systems? There is a Bulgarian now in an American prison for hacking into Hillary's server. Actually, we have known for years that they are, so this is just "catching up" to me.
     
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