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The Answer to Global warming is trains,Wind and Solar farms.

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by steveox, Jun 19, 2007.

  1. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    They should install High Speed trains underground tunnels. Like this High Speed train.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJKyisRKrLg
    If they put this train from Jacksonville Fla to Charlotte NC youll be there less than 2 hours and from Charlotte NC to Philadelphia PA youll be there in less than 2 Hours From Philadelphia PA to Buffalo NY youll be there in 2 Hours. This is what the Amtrak Auto Train should consider doing so not only youll be saving gas and not harming the environment cause Planes do harm the atmosphere 10 times more than Cars,Busses and trucks combined.We can cut down some Carbon dioxide by restricting a Lot of Flights and install new regalations. Like If that Flight isnt above 80% seats sold it doesnt take off you must cancell the flight and book em on another flight to fill 90% of the seatting. And Flights must fly at least 900 miles to another city you can No longer fly to Short distance. If you want to travel to short distance you can ether drive or taker the bus or the amrak.That would be ideal to help our planet.
     
  2. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    The answer to global warming is to look at the Earth's history. Warming and cooling are natural cycles. If the past is any indicator at all, it is going to continue to warm until no ice exists at ethier pole and remain at that warm temperature for several million years at which time, it will begin to cool again.

    If you look at the history of the earth it is clear that any ice at all is the anomoly, not the norm. If we are going to "do" anyting at all about global warming, we should be looking into technology that will make us more comfortable in the long summer that is coming. We have no more power to stop it, or even slow it down than we have to slow down a hurricaine which is next to nothing when compared to the global climate cycles.
     
  3. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    Scientist have the power to weaken an powerful hurricane by dropping a chemical from a plane to weaken the storm.But the EPA wont allow them to do it.
     
  4. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc/pages/FAQ/Myths_Modifications.php

    Clip:

    One of the biggest problems is, however, that it would take a LOT of the stuff to even hope to have an impact. 2 cm of rain falling over 1 square kilometer of surface deposits 20,000 metric tons of water. At the 2000-to-one ratio that the "Dyn-O-Gel" folks advertise, each square km would require 10 tons of goop. If we take the eye to be 20 km in diameter surrounded by a 20 km thick eyewall, that's 3,769.91 square kilometers, requiring 37,699.1 tons of "Dyn-O-Gel". A C-5A heavy-lift transport airplane can carry a 100 ton payload. So that treating the eyewall would require 377 sorties. A typical average reflectivity in the eyewall is about 40 dB(Z), which works out to 1.3 cm/hr rain rate. Thus to keep the eyewall doped up, you'd need to deliver this much "Dyn-O-Gel" every hour-and-a-half or so.


    Models suggest that the dyn o gel might actually make things worse:

    Accepting for the sake of argument that they actually did have an effect, the descriptions seem more consistent with an increase in hydrometeor fall speed and accelerated collision coalescence, which the numerical model results argue would strengthen the hurricane


    http://www.hurricaneville.com/todays_efforts.html

    Clip:

    There are also other ideas such as using windmills and dynamite, but the researchers still believe that it is impossible to weaken a hurricane because they are such vast storm systems.
     
  5. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    Well if NASA has the ability to move the comet or a metor from striking the earth by making go in a differant direction then scientist have the ability move the hurricane towards south head towards cuba or mexico.
     
  6. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    Nasa has no such abilities. You watch too many movies. We can't stop comets, we can't stop meteors, we can't slow down hurricaines, we can't stop tornadoes, hell, we can't even make sure that it rains enough on your garden every summer. The idea of changing a repeating global climate cycle is patently rediculous.
     
  7. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    Ever seen the news? They developed a lazer to detor the metor into another direction.But congress wont give em the money to develop such projects.
     
  8. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    I believe you have confused reality with Martin the Martian. A laser beam is made of light. Photons, even when concentrated into the most powerful of laser beams can not deflect a solid object. If the laser were able to project a sufficient magnitude of photons per cubic centemeter then perhaps it could go straight through a meteor, but could never deflect it.

    Physics is physics and you simply can't deflect a solid object with photons, no matter how many you throw at it.
     
  9. TruthAboveAll

    TruthAboveAll Active Member

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    Throwing photons at a meteor... LOL! Now THAT created a Gary Larson-esque vision in my mind... Thanks for the chuckle, PR!
     
  10. you may want to check the next post as well


    http://www.al.com/news/birminghamne..._standard.xsl?/base/news/1036318516252370.xml

    KENT FAULK

    HUNTSVILLE. A meeting here this week will focus on how beams of energy
    microwaves and lasers and such could be used to propel spaceships, deflect
    asteroids or even push microscopic crafts through our veins.

    Just 30 years ago, the first scientific papers began suggesting beamed
    energy propulsion, said Andrew Pakhomov, the University of Alabama in
    Huntsville researcher who is co-chairman of the First International
    Symposium on Beamed Energy Propulsion.

    "Now we are talking about hardware devices that work on these principles,"
    he said.

    The conference, which runs Tuesday through Thursday at UAH, is drawing more
    than 100 researchers from about 10 countries, Pakhomov said. They'll discuss
    their ideas, but they'll also talk about creating a program to support their
    work, including a research network among facilities with high-powered
    lasers, Pakhomov said.

    Among the speakers, Jonathan Campbell of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center
    in Huntsville will discuss using lasers to deflect asteroids, meteoroids and
    comets that might threaten Earth.

    Takahashi Yabe of the Tokyo Institute of Technology is scheduled to talk
    about how his lab used a laser to power a paper airplane. He and other
    Japanese scientists also are scheduled discuss how X-rays could one day be
    focused to propel "micro-ships" through the human body, Pakhomov said.

    Much of the UAH symposium, however, will be focused on using beamed energy
    to propel spacecraft, an idea on which Marshall is working.

    Researchers believe lasers eventually could be used to launch spacecraft
    into space or to push them on their way after they reach space. Beaming up
    energy means spacecraft wouldn't have to carry as much fuel.

    Pakhomov hopes to build a small experimental vehicle in the next year to
    test whether short laser pulses can propel it in a vacuum tube.

    Researchers also will hear from Alabama natives James and Gregory Benford
    about next year's experiment attempting to push a large sail in space with a
    half-million-watt microwave beam from Earth.

    "This is the first time anyone has attempted to beam energy to an object in
    space in an attempt to accelerate it," said James Benford, president of
    Microwave Sciences Inc. in California. His twin brother, Gregory Benford, is
    a professor at the University of California Irvine. The two physicists are
    natives of Fairhope and principal investigators in the Cosmos-1 experiment,
    a project of the Planetary Society.

    An exciting `shoot':

    Next year's experiment will be aboard a converted Russian intercontinental
    ballistic missile that will be launched from a Russian submarine. Once in
    orbit, blades on the spacecraft will fan out to form a sail 100 feet across.
    As it orbits about 500 miles from Earth, researchers will try to steer the
    microwave beam from the Deep Space Network in California onto the sail.

    Microwave dishes at that site normally are used to communicate with deep
    space probes. "The people at the deep space network are excited about it.
    They've never been asked to shoot at an object," James Benford said.

    An accelerometer on the sail will tell scientists how much the microwave
    beam was able to accelerate the sail.

    The experiment could prove the concept, but scientists already are saying
    they could develop more powerful microwave beams to push spacecraft along at
    one-tenth the speed of light, or about 18,600 mph, James Benford said.

    At that speed, it would take a probe about 42 years to reach Alpha Centauri,
    the star system nearest our solar system, James Benford said. With the
    velocity of current rockets, the trip would take about 40,000 years, he
    said.

    Beamed propulsion is the most near-term prospect for humans to reach other
    stars, James Benford said. "I think it is reasonable to think we could have
    probes at the nearby stars at the end of the century," he said.
     

  11. apparently your not exactly right here are you ? what old data are you relying on? It appears that Project orion has in fact been experimenting with moving objects in space and debris retreval as well as "ASTEROID AVOIDANCE" using.................Lasers you might want to look at the last post as well


    take a look here at this paper

    http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/cst/csat20.pdf

    here are some snippets from the pdf file
    =============================

    The Author

    Jonathan W. Campbell, a Colonel in the United States Air Force
    Reserve, is presently assigned as the Individual Mission Augmentee to the CADRE Commander at Air University. In civilian life, Dr. Campbell is a scientist and advanced projects manager in the Advanced Projects Office
    of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama.

    In that capacity he has worked for over 20 years in the space program a number of advanced research projects. He served as the project manager on Project ORION, which was a NASA study published in 1997 that explored the feasibility of using lasers to remove orbital debris. He has published more than fifty scientific
    papers on various subjects, including laser orbital debris removal and laser asteroid, meteoroid, and comet deflection.

    ============================

    Claude Phipps suggested the use of laser propulsion with a ground-based pulsed laser as a solution to the orbital debris problem in 1994 (Phipps 1994). The Orion Project, which was a study conducted by NASA
    and the USAF in 1995-96, concluded that the concept of using ground-based lasers for removing orbital debris is feasible and cost effective relative to the cost of placing objects in orbit (Campbell 1996). This study
    presents an analysis of the debris removal concept, and a plan for developing the technology for removing orbital debris with near-Earth lasers.

    This study begins with an analysis of the cost of a laser orbital debris removal system as the first step toward establishing the cost-effectiveness of this concept. This study then investigates the requirements
    for using laser propulsion for the diverse ensemble of debris particles in orbit. The following section demonstrates that the adaptive optics requirement for debris removal is within technological reach.

    After demonstrating that laser systems can effectively remove debris from orbit with the proper engagement strategy, the study concludes with a proposal to develop the technology for debris removal and advance that technology for laser space propulsion.


    ===========================


    III. Near Earth Asteroid Avoidance System


    Coupling PALS with powerful telescopes, such as those being developed under the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) project, would provide long-term warning for implementation of an overall NEO
    avoidance system. The feasibility of this system is discussed below.


    The lasers that would he used in Project Orion have demonstrated sufficient capability for orbital debris removal for objects in the size range from 1-10 cm diameter. Ground based experimental data, using a 20 kW
    pulsed laser, show that the impulse imparted to aluminum targets due to the ejected plasma cloud gives an average surface pressure p = 6.5 x 10-4 N/cm2, or equivalently, an acceleration, a = l.25x 10-6 m/s2 With present technology, a laser phased array can be aimed at the asteroid with sufficient power to ablate its surface. Assuming that a laser array can be
    scaled up to operate on a 1 km diameter iron asteroid, this would require a 200 GW power grid.


    Several alternate potential power sources are
    available, including nuclear or electric generation and solar power arrays. Let us assume that the asteroid is at infinity moving toward the Earth with a velocity v0 and impact parameter R. The closest point of approach Re is given by ...

    raed the rest in this interesting nasa related document
     
  12. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    Now if were smart enough to do this,,Invent computers and the internet were smart enough to do something about Hurricanes and reverse Global Warming.
     
  13. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    Sounds more like the side show at a Star Trek convention than any sort of real science. You shoud go. Maybe Jack Herer will be there collecting data on the effects of marijuana as they relate to experiments with lasers deflecting meteors.
     
  14. palerider

    palerider Well-Known Member

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    You apparently don't understand the article. We aren't smart enough to do this. At this point, we are only smart enough to wonder if it would work. And most of what we wonder doesn't actually work.
     
  15. Once again Palerider Knows better

    he knows more than

    Jonathan W. Campbell, a Colonel in the United States Air Force
    Reserve, is presently assigned as the Individual Mission Augmentee to the CADRE Commander at Air University. In civilian life, Dr. Campbell is a scientist and advanced projects manager in the Advanced Projects Office
    of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama.

    In that capacity he has worked for over 20 years in the space program a number of advanced research projects. He served as the project manager on Project ORION, which was a NASA study published in 1997 that explored the feasibility of using lasers to remove orbital debris. He has published more than fifty scientific
    papers on various subjects, including laser orbital debris removal and laser asteroid, meteoroid, and comet deflection.



    PULLLLLLLLLEZE
     
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