German language

Walter

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The German word "gerade" can mean...
  • straight
  • right now
  • especially
If the first letter is written in upper case ("Gerade") it is a noun and means
  • straight line
Confusing? What do you think the German sentence
  • "Ich fragte mich gerade, warum gerade diese Gerade so gerade ist"
means?
  • "I just wondered, why especially this line is so straight."
 
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Walter

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Another one. A train is a "Zug" in German.

The sentence "Der Zug ist abgefahren" can mean...

  • The train has left.
  • Something is no longer possible.
  • The train looks cool ("abgefahren" in the sense of freaky or cool)
 

Walter

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Jealousy is a passion that eagerly searches what causes pain.

In German:
Eifersucht ist eine Leidenschaft, die mit Eifer sucht, was Leiden schafft.

Notice the spaces. E.g.
  • "Leidenschaft", substantive, passion
  • "Leiden schaffen" contains "Leiden" which means "Suffering" and "schaffen" which means create
So in German Jealousy is a passion, that creates pain.
 

Starcastle

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German culture and language is definitely underappreciated. I love the food, the bier and the wine especially Gewürztraminers and Silvaner.

My favorite French dish is Alscatian, basically German. Choucroûte garnie.
 

Walter

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One of the strangest things in German are compound words - they basically have no limit, so you can string as many words as you want together as long as it makes sense.

An example:
Finanzdienstleistungsunternehmen.

Finanz = finance
Dienstleistung = service
Unternehmen = company

Three words compound to form a new word.

 

Walter

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German language flow chart shows if you should use the formal ("Sie") or informal version of "you" ("Du") when addressing a person.
I've seen this on Twitter without a source and a reverse image search didn't provide a source.

German-Sie-Du.jpg


If you think WTF - in English there was a time when we thou, thee, thy, thine, and ye.
:)
 
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the annoying thing

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Gegenseitigkeitsabkommensbeauftragterschild.

Gegenseitigkeit = mutuality
Abkommen = treaty
Beauftragter = represantive, officer
Schild = plate
No offense but to me the german language sounds like a man with a hair lip and a mouth full of shat trying to talk .But again I dated a young woman from south Africa yeas ago and her native tongue sounded the same way.
I think the french language is the sexiest sounding of them all .
Im American and have rarely heard the German language except in older war movies .
English has words that can mean various things also .
 
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