Would You Support This Bill?

Would you suport this bill?

  • Yes

    Votes: 5 62.5%
  • No

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 2 25.0%

  • Total voters
    8

DeanIss

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
5
So, would you support this bill?

The
Elected Representatives (Prohibition of Deception) Bill

requesting accountability through independent legal redress for misrepresentation or misleading statements or actions by our Elected Representatives.
(In other words ask your MP to support a law giving genuine accountability for deception)

To the House of Commons,
The Petition of citizens of the United Kingdom Declares that prior to the next general election it is imperative for all political parties to show their commitment to honesty, transparency and accountability; and further declares that a Private Member’s Bill entitled the Elected Representatives (Prohibition of Deception) Bill, presented by Adam Price MP on 17 October 2007, sought to achieve this aim by introducing legislation to protect the contract between the electorate and their representatives.

The Petitioners therefore request that the Houses of Commons urges Her Majesty’s Government to make provision for independent legal redress for misrepresentation or misleading statements or actions by elected representatives, by bringing forward proposals in line with those set out in the Elected Representatives (Prohibition of Deception) Bill, and to provide time for the House to debate these proposals.

To sum it up it - this bill would essentially make it a crime for MP's to lie. What do you guys think? If you vote please post your thoughts too.

(you can sign the actual petition here or learn more about it)
 
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Mare Tranquillity

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 15, 2007
Messages
3,477
I think it would depend partly on how the politicians are punished for lying, on one hand, here in the US, we could balance the budget by assessing large fines since all the lying bastards are rich, but it might be more satisfying to the electorate if we could stone them or tar and feather them.
 

Synical

Active Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2009
Messages
35
The punishment in place to enforce this bill would need to be extremely well thought out, many politicians would glady mislead the public to get elected regardless of their being a fine in place however in saying this ANY punishment that directed the public eye to an official punishment on a politician or party for misleading the public would be indeed powerful. Another problem that could arise with this bill is that it simply won't be enforced, I mean there's a lot of variables here that need to be considered one being the consequences of ignoring the bill and another being enforcement of the bill.
If the punishment is going to be as simple as a fine they need to make sure the repercussion of this is that the public are made aware.
 

dahermit

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2007
Messages
1,916
Just a note: Although the original post was about the U.K. government, there is something that is not generally known about the American Congress' "Congressional Record". Although the congressional record is assumed to be an accurate record of what was said on the floor of congress, before it is published, the members of congress (senators, representatives) may go in and edit what they have said for a period of 24 hours. There is no oversight as to how much editing they can do. They can and do, remove what was said, and replace it with what "they meant to say". It must be our own version of the Government "preventing deception, commitment to honesty, transparency and accountability". Shocking isn't it?
 

PLC1

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Staff member
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Apr 20, 2007
Messages
10,646
Location
The Golden State
So, would you support this bill?



To sum it up it - this bill would essentially make it a crime for MP's to lie. What do you guys think? If you vote please post your thoughts too.

(you can sign the actual petition here or learn more about it)

I would not like to see the US adopt such a policy, as it would lead to even more partisan witch hunts than we have currently.

If England does it, then we can watch and see if I was right. Maybe we can tell our friends on the other side of the pond, "I told you so."
 

DeanIss

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
5
Well this bill is from the film/documentary The Ministry of Truth. The interviewer interviews many MP's and asks them if they would support the bill. Its really quite interesting - he gets all the MP's to agree that they have an obligation to be honest to the public...then whips out the bill and every time the MP refuses it.

If I remember correctly it was stated in the documentary that the punishment for lying would be the removal of power with no allowance to be re-elected.

Another problem that could arise with this bill is that it simply won't be enforced, I mean there's a lot of variables here that need to be considered one being the consequences of ignoring the bill and another being enforcement of the bill.
Well perhaps, however at the end of the documentary one MP does in fact say he will gladly support it. Unfortunately while it was being introduced it ran out of time. Give this a read:

What’s the likelihood of the bill becoming law?

The Bill was originally presented by Adam Price MP to the House of Commons in October 2007, but ran out of time on second hearing.

After the expenses scandal, the coalition want to re-introduce it because the expense fraud is just a small part of a much bigger problem - MPs policing themselves for deception. No-one else can hold them to account.

Support is growing fast amongst MPs and the public. Especially in the current political climate. It’s too early to predict success or failure - the first stage is to get it debated in the House of Commons.

And to dahermit's post:
Wow...I had no idea a system like that was in place. It is shocking indeed.
 

Synical

Active Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2009
Messages
35
Just a note: Although the original post was about the U.K. government, there is something that is not generally known about the American Congress' "Congressional Record". Although the congressional record is assumed to be an accurate record of what was said on the floor of congress, before it is published, the members of congress (senators, representatives) may go in and edit what they have said for a period of 24 hours. There is no oversight as to how much editing they can do. They can and do, remove what was said, and replace it with what "they meant to say". It must be our own version of the Government "preventing deception, commitment to honesty, transparency and accountability". Shocking isn't it?

That is the most ridiculous system I have become aware off in a very long time, It makes you wonder how such "loop holes" in systems that originally hold such integrity become to be and most worringly of all not be so visible to the public.
 

DeanIss

Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
5
A appropiate punishment would be to end the offender's political career.
Thats precisely the punishment the bill is currently putting forward :)

That is the most ridiculous system I have become aware off in a very long time, It makes you wonder how such "loop holes" in systems that originally hold such integrity become to be and most worringly of all not be so visible to the public.
It really is quite worrying....There really needs to be a change with systems such as these.
 

Hanno

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2009
Messages
87
I don't think you can legislate you're way out of dishonesty in government - accountability must be demanded, in the economic sense of intent coupled with a means. A new law wouldn't be intent, it would be something put in place nominally to spare you the need to intend, and as a means it'd be both weak and ponderous.
 

Hanno

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2009
Messages
87
I never said you couldn't pass a bill - I'd never question Britain's willingness to legislate/be legislated upon...
 

dahermit

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2007
Messages
1,916
That is the most ridiculous system I have become aware off in a very long time, It makes you wonder how such "loop holes" in systems that originally hold such integrity become to be and most worringly of all not be so visible to the public.
It would seem that the ability to edit the "congressional record", is the only truly bi-partisan endeavor congress has ever produced.
 
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