1. Discuss politics - join our community by registering for free here! HOP - the political discussion forum

California drilling for water? Wheres the evoinmentalist?

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by steveox, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    7,499
    Likes Received:
    179
    Location:
    Way Down South
    California Farmers: Drill, Baby, Drill (for Water, That Is)

    California is locked in an epochal drought—and yet produce aisles nationwide still brim with reasonably prices fruit and vegetables from the Golden State. How does California continue providing half of US-grown vegetables under such parched conditions?

    Peter Gleick, president of the Pacific Institute, one of the world's leading think tanks on water issues, broke it down for me. He says that despite the drought, California farmers will likely idle only about a half million acres this year—less than 10 percent of normal plantings, which are about 8 million acres. And most of the fallowed land will involve "low-value" crops like cotton and alfalfa (used as a feed for the dairy and beef industries)—not the stuff you eat directly, like broccoli, lettuce, and almonds.

    In the Central Valley—California's most important growing region, which spans 450 miles along the center of the state—the drought is a massive inconvenience, but it hasn't cut farms off from water. Under ideal conditions, the great bulk of irrigation water flows through an elaborate network of canals and aqueducts that divert water from rivers (largely fed by Sierra Nevada snowmelt) to farms.

    http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philpott/2014/04/california-drought-groundwater-drilling

    So its ok to drill for water but not oil? Go figure
     
  2. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    Gotta keep the pot plants hydrated above all else.
     
  3. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    7,499
    Likes Received:
    179
    Location:
    Way Down South
    Yeah but do without. Take yer loss. Get farming some where else. Why should i pay $3.55 for a gallon of gas?
     
  4. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    599
    Location:
    The Golden State
    The value of the crops that weren't planted was given at $2.2 billion in the local news.
    And the city of Madera, start of the current leg of the train to now.. I mean high speed rail has seen its wells run dry. So have several small towns on the east of the San Joaquin Valley.

    And the well drillers are so over booked it takes 6 - 9 months before they can come and drill anyone's well a bit deeper.

    And the state is chronically short of water and uses more than mother nature gives us even in wet years.

    And the yahoos in Sacramento would rather build a train to no.. I mean high speed rail than new water storage, let alone a system to actually bring water into the state.

    And California produces somewhere around 50% of the nation's fruits and vegetables, including 99% of the almonds, and 80% of the world's almonds.

    And the growers say that it takes a gallon of water per almond. I can't verify that, but they should know.

    So, drill baby drill, but that isn't going to solve the water woes.

    Oh, and California's water woes are everyone's woes once the price increases hit the grocery stores.

    Just thought you'd like to know.
     
  5. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    It always amazes me how polititians keep rubberstamping development knowing full well the areas cannot support it.
    You guys need to get desalination going like Saudi Arabia did years ago.
    Water may start costing more than gas.
     
  6. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    599
    Location:
    The Golden State
    It is getting more expensive for sure.
    Desalination might work for urban use, but is too expensive for agriculture. What we need to do in the short term is conserve, in t he longer term, to bring more water in from somewhere else.
     
  7. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    So look to the sea for the costal metroplexes and free that water for ag.
    If those developers want to build they can pony up for a water plant.
     
  8. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    599
    Location:
    The Golden State
    That would no doubt help.

    It wouldn't solve the water problems, but it would help.
     
  9. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    Have to say when you talk about getting water from someplace else, i get uneasy as it suggests you are unwilling to accept that there is such a thing as "full".
     
  10. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    599
    Location:
    The Golden State
    ?? That I don't understand.
    If the reservoirs were full, we'd not need to be importing water.
     
  11. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    And if you had less demand it wouldnt depleat so. Like LA smog. Too many cars ina bowl that traps exausts. Fewer people fewer cars less smog. LA got "full" a couple generations ago but developers wont quit.
     
  12. Cruella

    Cruella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2012
    Messages:
    4,311
    Likes Received:
    726
    I never did understand why we never went the desalination route.

    Half of California is a desert and we never have had much rain fall. Of course it doesn't help that Sacramento lets a lot of our rain run off into the ocean.
     
  13. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    its really expensive. Saudi Arabia has money to burn. Cali not so much.
     
  14. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    10,598
    Likes Received:
    599
    Location:
    The Golden State
    I see. So, if we had fewer farmers, we'd need less water. That's a good point, I suppose. Maybe we could try growing peaches in Michigan, where there is plenty of water. Can you see any downside to that idea?
     
  15. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    17,848
    Likes Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Wandering around
    if you had fewer NON farmers. Send half of LA San Diego San Fran etc elsewhere .
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice