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Oregon wants to kill endangered birds

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by dogtowner, Apr 28, 2012.

  1. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    who eat endangered fish

    Spotted owls eat Spermburgers Microslugs, season opens tomorrow.

    Oregon needs federal approval to start shooting double-crested cormorants because the birds are protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
     
  2. steveox

    steveox Well-Known Member

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    Can we kill bald Eagles in Oregon?:)
     
  3. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Neither cormorants nor sea lions are endangered species.

    Game/fish management needs to be based on sound practice and science, not on politics. Sure, cormorants and sea lions do prey on salmon, no question, and there are a lot of both. What preys on sea lions? Great whites and killer whales mainly. What has happened to the great whites? People have caught a lot of them. Fewer great whites, more sea lions, fewer salmon, which also feed the killer whales. Everything is connected.

    Pick up one thing in nature, and you'll see that it's connected to everything else. There was a big commotion over wolves in Yellowstone. Reintroducing wolves helped the riparian habitat by increasing the growth of streamside willows. How? Because the elk went to higher ground to be able to watch for wolves, and didn't eat so many streamside willows. Result: More shade, cooler water, and therefore trout more because of wolves.

    Mountain lions in California haven't been hunted for a couple of decades now. One result? Trying to reintroduce the bighorn sheep has hit a snag, because of predation by mountain lions.

    Trout were removed from some of the High Sierra lakes here in order to give the yellow legged frog, an endangered species, a chance to rebuild. There may or may not be more frogs now, but there are more birds.

    Interesting. Why, you ask? Because both birds and trout eat bugs.

    It's all connected. Scientific game management is the only way to go.
     
  4. Pandora

    Pandora Well-Known Member

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    No I do not think so but we do have public funded suicide :)
     
  5. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    only if the dying fish they eat are endangered.
    they're not good eatin like spotted owl eggs so whats the point ?
     
  6. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    yeah but salmon is an in dustry
     
  7. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, it is, and one that deserves protection.
     
  8. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    not a salmon fan but you're probably right
     
  9. Cruella

    Cruella Well-Known Member

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    The econuts in California kill more endangered birds than anyone with all their wind farms. They also kill a lot of turtles and other creatures with their solar panels.
     
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