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Rural Needy receive less Financial Help

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by asur, May 12, 2009.

  1. asur

    asur New Member

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    It appears Obama isn't so fair or watchful in his stimulous spending.
    The big liberal cities get theirs, but what about the rural, hard working areas?

    From AP Press:

    Counties suffering the most from job losses stand to receive the least help from President Barack Obama's plan to spend billions of stimulus dollars on roads and bridges, an Associated Press analysis has found.

    One result among many: Elk County, Pa., isn't receiving any road money despite its 13.8 percent unemployment rate. Yet the military and college community of Riley County, Kan., with its 3.4 percent unemployment, will benefit from about $56 million to build a highway, improve an intersection and restore a historic farmhouse.

    Altogether, the government is set to spend 50 percent more per person in areas with the lowest unemployment than it will in communities with the highest.

    Now we can Ignore what Obama Admin says but simply note what happens:

    "We cannot wait," Vice President Joe Biden said last week when announcing a $30 million transit project in his hometown of Wilmington, Del., where the 7.7 percent unemployment rate remains below the national average. "We're spending a lot of time and money. Why? It's about ... jobs, jobs, jobs, jobs. That's why we cannot wait."

    Yet residents of Perry County, Tenn., will have to wait. County Mayor John Carroll said he's disappointed his community, which suffers from 25.4 percent unemployment, won't receive a dime any time soon for its road needs.

    The bottom line: Obama can't run any program in the right way.
     
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