Drugs in Schools

zerorelations

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Dec 9, 2006
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Like it or not, drugs have been finding, and always will find their way into our nation's public schools. There is a gigantic market for these teenagers to get into drugs ranging from alcohol (most popular) to cigarettes, dip, and marijuana. At my school, there is even an epidemic of cocaine coming down from a dealer in Atlanta, GA. How can we possibly stop the drug trade and use in the school system without invading the rights of the students/parents? I believe that to stop the drug trade in the U.S., we must first stop it in the schools, because that is where the majority of users get hooked. I am not saying alcohol is bad, but the secondhand drugs such as cigarettes and marijuana, and the harder drugs such as cocaine need to controlled more heavily, without taking the rights of the citizens of our nation.

ideas?
 
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Rokerijdude11

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Yes the ONLY way you can or WILL take this problem out of the schools is by following the Dutch Model. and by making "Soft Drugs" legal and putting an end to the prohibition of Marijuana and hemp.

By taking the illegality out of it and taxing and regualting it it eliminates the criminal element from the equationthen use the reosurces that were being WASTED on enforcing ridiculous marijuana offenses, and pour it into government funded and operated drug rehab centers and enforcement of "Hard drug" laws with much harsher penalties


Take a look at overall Teenaged drug use in the netherlands compared to the united states it will be startlingly clear to you....repeal marijauana /hemp prohibition and end the war on marijuana use those funds to educate and rehabilitate the Hard drug users


it worked in holland and it would work here too
 

vyo476

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Massachusetts
Yes the ONLY way you can or WILL take this problem out of the schools is by following the Dutch Model. and by making "Soft Drugs" legal and putting an end to the prohibition of Marijuana and hemp.

By taking the illegality out of it and taxing and regualting it it eliminates the criminal element from the equationthen use the reosurces that were being WASTED on enforcing ridiculous marijuana offenses, and pour it into government funded and operated drug rehab centers and enforcement of "Hard drug" laws with much harsher penalties


Take a look at overall Teenaged drug use in the netherlands compared to the united states it will be startlingly clear to you....repeal marijauana /hemp prohibition and end the war on marijuana use those funds to educate and rehabilitate the Hard drug users


it worked in holland and it would work here too

All good ideas - using money saved from enforcement of marijuana laws to better enforce laws regarding things like heroin and cocaine is particularly nice - and I think that there's room here for more expansion. Perhaps investing some of that capital in better drug-awareness programs would be a good idea. Having within the last year graduated from a public high school myself, the awareness programs I personally went through were pretty laughable and didn't provide enough usable knowledge to do any good for any of us. Hearing a middle aged bald man saying, "Drugs are bad for you. Don't do drugs," for a half an hour isn't going to convince a teenager who is on the fence or already taking things like cocaine that it's a bad idea.
 

Lindsay

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Cincinnati
My high school used to have metal detectors (yes, I know drugs aren't metal) but they patted you down and searched you. Also, clear backpacks and purses were only allowed. It worked for about two years, until funding was cut. Now it's worse than ever.
 

OPGhostdog

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May 25, 2007
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186
First of ALL who do you blame...The School System?

I am going to be the first to answer my own question. Actually its
a concernd that consist of School Administrators, Local law Agents,
County Law Enforcement groups, and Federal law groups, and please
believe me the MOST important people is the Parents.

Most drugs that enter a school is brought in by students who wanna
be the cool one, and this is where peer-preasure intervention and
prevention education comes in. Personally, situations like this is part
of my daily job as a Child Protection Officer. Also I am a Community
Activist against Rights violations, and for a better Education. I see
this happen at least 3 times a week, and yesterday in broad daytime
one of the City Schools (Wooden Block) Playfield was set on fire by
a few teen-agers smoking crack.

This is why I blame it on the local Law Enforcement agencies. If
they would give heavy populared areas the attention, and the
neighborhood people would watch out this kind of incident would
be avoided.

There is staff members who bring dope and weed into the school
building to sell to the young people. So I believe that we should
stop running off at the mouth, and put the talk into action will
help the situation.
 

Cheshire Cat

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May 16, 2007
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Wonderland
All good ideas - using money saved from enforcement of marijuana laws to better enforce laws regarding things like heroin and cocaine is particularly nice - and I think that there's room here for more expansion. Perhaps investing some of that capital in better drug-awareness programs would be a good idea. Having within the last year graduated from a public high school myself, the awareness programs I personally went through were pretty laughable and didn't provide enough usable knowledge to do any good for any of us. Hearing a middle aged bald man saying, "Drugs are bad for you. Don't do drugs," for a half an hour isn't going to convince a teenager who is on the fence or already taking things like cocaine that it's a bad idea.
Damn, things haven't changed one bit in the last 28 years. In 1979 I could get pot, coke, acid, peyote, and any pill I wanted on campus. The only defense is parents that talk to their kids. You are right, some middle-aged bald guy that you don't know isn't going to convince teens to stay away from drugs. At least parents that are open, honest and willing to admit their own mistakes have a chance. But then, the parents have to start talking to their kids when they are really young, and build that trust up, they can't wait until the kid is 15 and then expect that all of the sudden the kid is going to listen to them when it comes to drugs.
 

ArmChair General

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Damn, things haven't changed one bit in the last 28 years. In 1979 I could get pot, coke, acid, peyote, and any pill I wanted on campus. The only defense is parents that talk to their kids. You are right, some middle-aged bald guy that you don't know isn't going to convince teens to stay away from drugs. At least parents that are open, honest and willing to admit their own mistakes have a chance. But then, the parents have to start talking to their kids when they are really young, and build that trust up, they can't wait until the kid is 15 and then expect that all of the sudden the kid is going to listen to them when it comes to drugs.

yep. if parents would actually parent....


but kids are still going to do whatever they want to do. Parents can only do so much, its up to their kids to make the right choices. Though, actual parenting can go a long way to direct them to the right ones.
 

Cheshire Cat

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yep. if parents would actually parent....


but kids are still going to do whatever they want to do. Parents can only do so much, its up to their kids to make the right choices. Though, actual parenting can go a long way to direct them to the right ones.

Yes, parents have to actually parent. If they don't, the government and the schools will never change the outcome. Unfortunately, there are too many schools and government agencies convincing parents that they can do better than the parents. And parents are acquiescing to that. The results are abysmal.
 

ArmChair General

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Yes, parents have to actually parent. If they don't, the government and the schools will never change the outcome. Unfortunately, there are too many schools and government agencies convincing parents that they can do better than the parents. And parents are acquiescing to that. The results are abysmal.

I think that you are wrong in your analysis. I think that there are too many parents who are absolutely terrible and parenting. So the state trys to pick up the slack. And the state can only do so much.

But I think it begins with the terrible parents, not the state trying to tell them they can do it better.

in a lot of cases, the state can actually do it better too, depending on how ****ty the parents are.

Id say like 80% of all parents are ****ty parents by the way
 

Cheshire Cat

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I think that you are wrong in your analysis. I think that there are too many parents who are absolutely terrible and parenting. So the state trys to pick up the slack. And the state can only do so much.

But I think it begins with the terrible parents, not the state trying to tell them they can do it better.

in a lot of cases, the state can actually do it better too, depending on how ****ty the parents are.

Id say like 80% of all parents are ****ty parents by the way

I disagree with your percentage of ****ty parents, but I do know that no government agency can do any better, the proof is in the results.
 

drippinhun

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May 28, 2007
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The educational system is so out of whack and so is society in general. The entire structure of all needs reexamination (without involvement from the so-called experts who make their living off of the mess) and a better approach is warranted.
 

9sublime

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I went to a private school and a state school, and drugs infiltrated both of them. At the private school, a couple of kids every three or four years would get busted smoking a spliff, but they were rich and came from good backgrounds, and it was a small school, so it didn't happen very often.

The state school was about four times larger, and so the drugs problem was bound to be bigger. But the school also accepted kids from every background (it had to), and so more of them were inclined to be sucked into it. Kids were stoned in school everyday, the usual suspects, not many though. And occassionally one or two idiots would turn up to school gurning on ecstasy. Its probably more shocking for Americans to hear that, and its shocking for me too, but ecstasy is very much a part of youth culture here because of raves and all.
 

top gun

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Damn, things haven't changed one bit in the last 28 years. In 1979 I could get pot, coke, acid, peyote, and any pill I wanted on campus. The only defense is parents that talk to their kids. You are right, some middle-aged bald guy that you don't know isn't going to convince teens to stay away from drugs. At least parents that are open, honest and willing to admit their own mistakes have a chance. But then, the parents have to start talking to their kids when they are really young, and build that trust up, they can't wait until the kid is 15 and then expect that all of the sudden the kid is going to listen to them when it comes to drugs.

I was thinking the same thing about my old high school days in the 70's. The better the dialog with your kids... the more chance you have of them making at least lesser mistake.

Great post!
 
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OPGhostdog

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When parents are giving their children a (what I call drug education).
They should try to avoid boosting about how good the weed was back
then or how they did coke to hype up their sex drive. However straight
up hardcore facts about how drugs and alcohol will treat the body and
mind would really hit a nerve in their minds.

Many school students ALL AGES is getting high, due to the fact that
most parents is doing it in the homes, and they have picked up the
habit from the parents. At the place where I work we have a drug
and alcohol intervention & prevention program that we host through
out the School Systems to help bring students awareness up.

What we did back then did not twist society up like it is today.
So we need to stop comparing back then with now, and what
is really needed is more teaching in the homes. As a single Dad
I begin to talk to my two kids at the age of 6 years old, but dig
this at that time I was using drugs & alcohol myself, and they
watch me until I got myself straight (soon be 9 years ago).

In closing, I had the desire and motivation to prevent my kids
from doing what I was doing, and I explained to them how wrong
I was. Now I host Drug Awareness programs for Adults and
Students (all ages), and part of my current job is investigating
homes where children is in a drug or alcoholic environment.
Where in some cases the Child is removed from the home, and
that depends on the intake investigation work that I turn in.

Yes...Yes...Yes The School Systems need to take control, and
hold the parents responsible for their child's actions and behavior.
 
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