The US fiasco in Iraq

Texas_tea

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Actually, I was speaking of all countries who should feel threatened by Islam extremism ... including yours.

You seriously believe that they have no intent to export terrorism, or attack the US, or attack Israel, or attack Australia ... or kill off all non-Muslims within their borders?

Really?
There is decades of passivism .... are you really shocked at Aus's (4 degrees) response ...

You know history .... you know how his ignorance always turns out ...

A newer better brand of Marxism my as* ......
 
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GBFan

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The news cycle has offered a stark reminder recently of the ever-widening gulf between civilian and military cultures in America.

It kicked off with the Bowe Bergdahl affair. The president’s assertion that the trade of five Taliban commanders for Bergdahl was justified due to a sacred duty he had to bring this “kid” home was met with a lot of head-scratching by both veterans and active duty men and women.

Fine. Maybe if we were talking about a Kyle Carpenter, Dakota Meyer or a Michael Murphy, then the trade would have been justified in the eyes of those who served. (Although not in the eyes of Carpenter, Meyer or Murphy, I’d argue – they’d never agree to trade their salvation for the enemy’s freedom).

But while most of America reflexively rejoiced at the news of Bergdahl’s release, most combat veterans immediately began to ask if the trade of five enemy commanders was worth someone who mysteriously wandered off his post in the middle of a combat zone, prompting months of fruitless and deadly search and rescue missions on his behalf.

This reaction isn’t politically driven; it is the natural outcome of a culture that values earned honor, reputation, and character over notions that anything is inherently “owed” to anyone by virtue of wearing the uniform or touching terra firma in a warzone.

In the military you have to earn your honor and your comrades’ pledged devotion to sacrifice their lives on your behalf. And you don’t automatically acquire that badge honor for life the minute you take your oath or set foot in Afghanistan. That honor can be lost forever if you betray your friends’ trust or your country’s values.

Bergdahl lost his honor. I was in Afghanistan as a special operations pilot when Bergdahl was a prisoner. It was an open secret that he was a deserter, possibly a collaborator. From my perspective there was no great urgency to get him back, nor was there an appetite to risk more lives to find him.

Talk to the average man or woman on the front lines and they’ll tell you the trade wasn’t worth it. Not a chance, they’ll likely add.

Enough about that.

The recent collapse of Iraq under the ISIS blitzkrieg also sparked a very unique response from the veterans who fought in that country compared with the majority civilian opinion, and the majority opinion of most talking heads (including many former generals) on cable TV.

Young veterans who fought in the dusty, hot streets of Fallujah, Baghdad, Mosul, now openly joke, “Just give me some of my guys and some weapons and a plane ticket.”

“Let’s get the band back together for a reunion tour,” one of my friends, a former Marine machine gunner who fought during the surge, wrote on Facebook.

But before you roll your eyes and classify this knee-jerk reaction as the symptom of some testosterone-induced warriorness, it’s important to realize why these young men and women want to go back and fight.

It’s not to make their previous sacrifices “worth it,” or to retroactively justify the unrecoverable currency of their youths forever lost in the sands of Iraq. The overwhelming reason veterans want to go back to war in Iraq is because they feel like they owe it to the Iraqi people. The images of the decent people of Iraq are not just a photo or B-roll footage for them; they are memories emblazoned forever in minds, imprinted more deeply by the intensity of war.

TV commentators, pundits, and think-tank experts will talk about America’s strategic interests, deflecting Iran, appeasing our Arab partners, preserving or abandoning the Sykes-Picot borders. To those who never fought in Iraq, the overwhelming question is – “Is Iraq worth it?”

But to veterans who understand and remember the war as a personal experience, they don’t think in those terms. They ask – “Is it right to abandon those people in Iraq who risked their lives to support our cause?”

Veterans of Iraq also comprehend the reality of the evil against which they fought. To them it wouldn’t matter if those ISIS terrorists (who are descendants of al-Qaida in Iraq) took over Iraq, Fiji or a peninsula in Antarctica. In their minds, evil like that should never be allowed to flourish or take root anywhere in the world. Stopping the spread of mass murder and oppression is always “worth it.”

There’s no doubt that there are a lot creeps and thugs in Iraq, including in its government, who don’t deserve our help. But there are also many Iraqis who risked everything — their wealth, lives and their families — to support and defend U.S. forces during the Sunni Awakening.

Those who risked everything to support the U.S. war effort in Iraq earned that rare brand of honor that the military so judiciously awards for courage, and definitively rescinds for cowardice or betrayal.

The decent people of Iraq have, in the eyes of those who knew them, earned the promise of our salvation.

Nolan Peterson is a former Air Force Special Operations pilot and veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. He is now a war correspondent and cofounder of BlueForceTracker.com.
 

katsung47

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840. US keeps Iraq a battle field to adjust oil price (6/25/2014)
Since the recent Iraq crisis created by the US is to save dollar, US will maintain the current situation unchanged. A US craft carrier has been deployed in Mid-East, no air attack has done so far.
Analysis: Obama plan leaves Iraq mostly on its own
By LARA JAKES 6/20/2014
http://news.yahoo.com/analysis-obama-plan-leaves-iraq-mostly-own-040646350.html
Three hundred US military advisors were sent to Iraq. Their role likely is to instruct Iraqi troops to retreat from cities or oil fields when they want the oil price to go up. Or vice versa.
The US will turn Iraq into another battle field. Let Arabs fight Arabs. Decades ago, it was Saddam's Iraq vs. Iran. Now it will be Sunni's Iraq, Saudi, Qarda vs. Shiiti Iraq, Iran.
That's a strategy it used to play, just like it manipulates Democrats and Republicans in domestic politics.
How the US is Arming Both Sides of the Iraqi Conflict
By Tyler Durden
Global Research, June 13, 2014
http://www.globalresearch.ca/how-the-us-is-arming-both-sides-of-the-iraqi-conflict/5386926
 

Texas_tea

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according to ISS there is no such thing as Iraq. It is a western invention.
Of course it is ..... Radical Islam supports the same government repression as you do. One in the name of no religion "Communism" and the other in the name of religious repression "Islam" ....

It is all total government control of human beings lives .....

You should be pleased Aus that more human beings are suffering under this sick ideology!

Please ..... continue to post your nonsense!
 

pocketfullofshells

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The news cycle has offered a stark reminder recently of the ever-widening gulf between civilian and military cultures in America.

It kicked off with the Bowe Bergdahl affair. The president’s assertion that the trade of five Taliban commanders for Bergdahl was justified due to a sacred duty he had to bring this “kid” home was met with a lot of head-scratching by both veterans and active duty men and women.

Fine. Maybe if we were talking about a Kyle Carpenter, Dakota Meyer or a Michael Murphy, then the trade would have been justified in the eyes of those who served. (Although not in the eyes of Carpenter, Meyer or Murphy, I’d argue – they’d never agree to trade their salvation for the enemy’s freedom).

But while most of America reflexively rejoiced at the news of Bergdahl’s release, most combat veterans immediately began to ask if the trade of five enemy commanders was worth someone who mysteriously wandered off his post in the middle of a combat zone, prompting months of fruitless and deadly search and rescue missions on his behalf.

This reaction isn’t politically driven; it is the natural outcome of a culture that values earned honor, reputation, and character over notions that anything is inherently “owed” to anyone by virtue of wearing the uniform or touching terra firma in a warzone.

In the military you have to earn your honor and your comrades’ pledged devotion to sacrifice their lives on your behalf. And you don’t automatically acquire that badge honor for life the minute you take your oath or set foot in Afghanistan. That honor can be lost forever if you betray your friends’ trust or your country’s values.

Bergdahl lost his honor. I was in Afghanistan as a special operations pilot when Bergdahl was a prisoner. It was an open secret that he was a deserter, possibly a collaborator. From my perspective there was no great urgency to get him back, nor was there an appetite to risk more lives to find him.

Talk to the average man or woman on the front lines and they’ll tell you the trade wasn’t worth it. Not a chance, they’ll likely add.

Enough about that.

The recent collapse of Iraq under the ISIS blitzkrieg also sparked a very unique response from the veterans who fought in that country compared with the majority civilian opinion, and the majority opinion of most talking heads (including many former generals) on cable TV.

Young veterans who fought in the dusty, hot streets of Fallujah, Baghdad, Mosul, now openly joke, “Just give me some of my guys and some weapons and a plane ticket.”

“Let’s get the band back together for a reunion tour,” one of my friends, a former Marine machine gunner who fought during the surge, wrote on Facebook.

But before you roll your eyes and classify this knee-jerk reaction as the symptom of some testosterone-induced warriorness, it’s important to realize why these young men and women want to go back and fight.

It’s not to make their previous sacrifices “worth it,” or to retroactively justify the unrecoverable currency of their youths forever lost in the sands of Iraq. The overwhelming reason veterans want to go back to war in Iraq is because they feel like they owe it to the Iraqi people. The images of the decent people of Iraq are not just a photo or B-roll footage for them; they are memories emblazoned forever in minds, imprinted more deeply by the intensity of war.

TV commentators, pundits, and think-tank experts will talk about America’s strategic interests, deflecting Iran, appeasing our Arab partners, preserving or abandoning the Sykes-Picot borders. To those who never fought in Iraq, the overwhelming question is – “Is Iraq worth it?”

But to veterans who understand and remember the war as a personal experience, they don’t think in those terms. They ask – “Is it right to abandon those people in Iraq who risked their lives to support our cause?”

Veterans of Iraq also comprehend the reality of the evil against which they fought. To them it wouldn’t matter if those ISIS terrorists (who are descendants of al-Qaida in Iraq) took over Iraq, Fiji or a peninsula in Antarctica. In their minds, evil like that should never be allowed to flourish or take root anywhere in the world. Stopping the spread of mass murder and oppression is always “worth it.”

There’s no doubt that there are a lot creeps and thugs in Iraq, including in its government, who don’t deserve our help. But there are also many Iraqis who risked everything — their wealth, lives and their families — to support and defend U.S. forces during the Sunni Awakening.

Those who risked everything to support the U.S. war effort in Iraq earned that rare brand of honor that the military so judiciously awards for courage, and definitively rescinds for cowardice or betrayal.

The decent people of Iraq have, in the eyes of those who knew them, earned the promise of our salvation.

Nolan Peterson is a former Air Force Special Operations pilot and veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. He is now a war correspondent and cofounder of BlueForceTracker.com.

this guys a idiot...to bad you have nothing of value to add yourself. All of the Top Brass and comanders of hte Military agreed to the exchange. I know it pisses you guys off to bring back troops, your much better at sending them out to die for your lies.
 

GBFan

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this guys a idiot...to bad you have nothing of value to add yourself. All of the Top Brass and comanders of hte Military agreed to the exchange. I know it pisses you guys off to bring back troops, your much better at sending them out to die for your lies.

You are SO out of touch ... the military commanders follow orders, to include the order that says that they will publicly support any decision made by the President, no matter how incompetent he might be ... there isn't an active duty general in the country that would publicly challenge the civilian authority.
 

Texas_tea

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You are SO out of touch ... the military commanders follow orders, to include the order that says that they will publicly support any decision made by the President, no matter how incompetent he might be ... there isn't an active duty general in the country that would publicly challenge the civilian authority.
GB you are wasting your time.. This guy is so diseased with liberalism there is no saving him!!
 

dogtowner

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this guys a idiot...to bad you have nothing of value to add yourself. All of the Top Brass and comanders of hte Military agreed to the exchange. I know it pisses you guys off to bring back troops, your much better at sending them out to die for your lies.
Five years does not demonstrate any urgency in bringing him back so there was no excuse violating law for congressioal notification.
The issue us willfull disregard of the rule of law.
 

Stalin

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The Vietnamese people heroically saw off the Japanese, then the French and finally the fascists in 1975.

It was a golden moment for all those who fought to end the war and the attempts by the ignorant on this forum, to rewrite history, 40 years on, are both sad and laughable.

The Yanks got their butts kicked..pure and simple

Comrade Stalin
 
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GBFan

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The Vietnamese people heroically saw off the Japanese, then the French and finally the fascists in 1975.

It was a golden moment for all those who fought to end the war and the attempts by the ignorant on this forum, to rewrite history, 40 years on, are both sad and laughable.

The Yanks got their butts kicked..pure and simple

Comrade Stalin

Don't let facts get in your way ....
 
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