US First Muslim Representative

USMC the Almighty

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Also the notion that we need to be afraid of Muslims or suspicious of them is totally bogus.

I disagree. Look at the people who, according to our recent history, are most likely to attack this country. It's Muslims. So it's only natural that you would be most suspicious of them.

For example, have you seen the names of the people caught in the UK last summer mere days away from carrying out another attack using jetliners:

Umir Hussain, 24
Muhammed Usman Saddique, 24
Waheed Zaman, 22
Assan Abdullah Khan, 22
Waseem Kayani, 28
Waheed Arafat Khan, 24
Cossor Ali, 24
Tayib Rauf, 21
Ibrahim Savant, 26
Osman Adam Khatib, 20
Shamin Mohammed Uddin, 36
Amin Asmin Tariq, 23
Shazad Khuram Ali, 27
Tanvir Hussain, 24
Umar Islam, 28
Assad Sarwar, 25
Abdullah Ali, 26
Abdul Muneem Patel, 17
Nabeel Hussain, 21

Hmmm...no pattern to justify profiling.
 
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USMC the Almighty

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Actually, American muslims are quite well assimilated.

From Wikipedia:
According to a 2004 telephone survey of a sample of 1846 Muslims conducted by Zogby the respondents were more educated and affluent than the national average, with 59% of them holding at least an undergraduate college degree. Citing the Zogby survey, a 2005 Wall Street Journal editorial, by Bret Stephens and Joseph Rago expressed the tendency of American Muslims to report employment in professional fields, with one in three having an income over $75,000 a year. [33] The editorial also characterized American Muslims as "role models both as Americans and as Muslims".​

What does this prove? So they go to college and make a lot of money. That says nothing of their feelings regarding this country.

and in a more recent poll, which was discussed on another thread, the StarTribune reported the following:

A major poll of American Muslims by one of the most respected pollsters in the country reveals substantial differences between American and European Muslims. The American Muslims by a huge margin reject Islamic extremism. They are educated, affluent, happy and largely assimilated.​

I'm glad that they reject terrorism but again, this doesn't say anything about their loyalty to the U.S.
 

Coyote

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What does this prove? So they go to college and make a lot of money. That says nothing of their feelings regarding this country.



I'm glad that they reject terrorism but again, this doesn't say anything about their loyalty to the U.S.

So you demand a loyalty test? Because they're muslim? Do Christians need a loyalty test?

Among the polls findings:

# Overall, Muslim Americans have a generally positive view of the larger society. Most say their communities are excellent or good places to live.

# A large majority of Muslim Americans believe that hard work pays off in this society. Fully 71% agree that most people who want to get ahead in the U.S. can make it if they are willing to work hard.

# The survey shows that although many Muslims are relative newcomers to the U.S., they are highly assimilated into American society. On balance, they believe that Muslims coming to the U.S. should try and adopt American customs, rather than trying to remain distinct from the larger society. And by nearly two-to-one (63%-32%) Muslim Americans do not see a conflict between being a devout Muslim and living in a modern society.​

I believe that indicates they are Americans first, particularly in light of the following:

A majority of Muslim Americans (53%) say it has become more difficult to be a Muslim in the U.S. since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Most also believe that the government "singles out" Muslims for increased surveillance and monitoring.​
 

USMC the Almighty

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I can't argue against your stats, but from my personal experience I don't see Muslims assimilating at the rate the poll claims.
 

Sgt Schultz

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Fair enough. One important thing though that rarely gets mentioned is that the Japanese (and Koreans) enlisted in the military in huge numbers during that time as a way to prove their patriotism. You don't see Muslims doing that. The Muslims don't make any attempts at assimilating into American culture so it's hard for me to see them as "Americans first".

When I look at someone I can tell what their ancestry is, or pretty close. But when it comes to religion I can't. The family of Chinese ancestry who lives next to me is what religion by looking at them? Or the guy of Lebanese ancestry down the road? Religion is a personal choice, not one of genetics.
 

USMC the Almighty

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When I look at someone I can tell what their ancestry is, or pretty close. But when it comes to religion I can't. The family of Chinese ancestry who lives next to me is what religion by looking at them? Or the guy of Lebanese ancestry down the road? Religion is a personal choice, not one of genetics.

Well I know beyond a shadow of doubt that my neighbor is Jewish and I've never seen her go to the Synagogue.

Humor aside, obviously you can't always discern a specific given individual's religion by their appearance. But there are certainly patterns between what type of people join what religions. The average Muslim fits a general pattern and if you deny this then you are politically correct to the point of blindness.
 

Sgt Schultz

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Well I know beyond a shadow of doubt that my neighbor is Jewish and I've never seen her go to the Synagogue.

Humor aside, obviously you can't always discern a specific given individual's religion by their appearance. But there are certainly patterns between what type of people join what religions. The average Muslim fits a general pattern and if you deny this then you are politically correct to the point of blindness.

None of the Muslim's that I know are terrorists, or are inclined to be terrorists. All of them are on active duty or are retired military for that matter. I no more question their loyalty to this country than I do anyone else.
 

USMC the Almighty

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I personally don't know any Muslim terrorists either, but the historical data does indicate that Muslim males between the ages of 18 and 35 are the most likely people to launch an attack on the United States.
 

SW85

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Ellison is a very suspicious character, at best. He has still not answered for his earlier membership in radical Islamic organizations (he was a member of the Nation of Islam, wasn't he?) and he has given open and unabashed support to unindicted terrorist co-conspirator CAIR.
 

Coyote

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Ellison is a very suspicious character, at best. He has still not answered for his earlier membership in radical Islamic organizations (he was a member of the Nation of Islam, wasn't he?) and he has given open and unabashed support to unindicted terrorist co-conspirator CAIR.

That's silly. CAIR is no more a terrorist group then APAC or the Anti-Defamation league.
 

vyo476

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Wait, are you telling me that there's a man in Congress with a potentially dirty background?

Now what are the chances of that...?
 
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Bunz

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I disagree. Look at the people who, according to our recent history, are most likely to attack this country. It's Muslims. So it's only natural that you would be most suspicious of them.

For example, have you seen the names of the people caught in the UK last summer mere days away from carrying out another attack using jetliners:


Hmmm...no pattern to justify profiling.

While I dont disagree that there have been many Muslims terrorists, my point in the whole thing was to point out that Muslims, just being Muslims we should not be suspicious of them having a bomb strapped to themselves all the time.
Now I will point out, that there have been only two major attacks my Muslims in the US, in the last 27 years. The original WTC bombing, and the 9/11 attacks. In the meantime, Americans, presumably Christian or at least non muslims in the same time period, were responsible for Oklahoma city, the Unabomber, Eric Rudolph, DC Sniper, along with several school shootings, and serial killers, which I am going to lump into terrorist acts.
My point on this issue is that a very small minority of Muslim Americans are terrorists(I have yet to see a name of a Muslim-American citizen commit a terrorist act) and there are plenty of other American citizens who carry out terrorist attacks. This doesnt justify any of them as I find them all deplorable, but it is not quite fair for us to lump them into one group, as is the same as all hispanics being illegal immigrants, blacks being gangmembers etc. The KKK is probably the worst single terrorist groups in American history.
 
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