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Who from history would you invite to dinner?

Discussion in 'Historical Events & Figures' started by T3sting, Feb 22, 2007.

  1. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    Titus Labienus.

    Just to ask why he left Ceasar and went over to Pompey.
     
  2. Nerv14

    Nerv14 Member

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    I have always liked Alexander Hamilton and I would love to see what he thinks about America today, especially since he supported a strong federal government...

    I just heard that he has a statue in Washington and I missed it twice when I went to DC! That gets me pissed...

    Yeah, Hamilton would kick Burr's ass this time. :)
     
  3. Atheist Woody

    Atheist Woody Member

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    Sun Tzu, Caeser, Napoleon & Wellington.
     
  4. 9sublime

    9sublime Well-Known Member

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    George Orwell, Karl Marx and Jesus.
     
  5. SW85

    SW85 Well-Known Member

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    Yep, it's amazing how any glorification of Third World tyranny and genocide becomes tolerable when one appends to it a subtle dig at Bush.

    As for me, I'd have liked to have met Bill Buckley.
     
  6. Rhodri

    Rhodri Well-Known Member

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    The greatest American and my choice for dinner is Ben Franklin. Taken from Wikipedia....

    Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 [O.S. January 6, 1706] – April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author and printer, satirist, political theorist, politician, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman and diplomat. As a scientist he was a major figure in the Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and a musical instrument. He formed both the first public lending library in America and first fire department in Pennsylvania. He was an early proponent of colonial unity and as a political writer and activist he, more than anyone, invented the idea of an American nation[1] and as a diplomat during the American Revolution, he secured the French alliance that helped to make independence possible.

    Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Franklin learned printing from his older brother and became a newspaper editor, printer, and merchant in Philadelphia, becoming very wealthy, writing and publishing Poor Richard's Almanack and the Pennsylvania Gazette. Franklin was interested in science and technology, and gained international renown for his famous experiments. He played a major role in establishing the University of Pennsylvania and Franklin & Marshall College and was elected the first president of the American Philosophical Society. Franklin became a national hero in America when he spearheaded the effort to have Parliament repeal the unpopular Stamp Act. An accomplished diplomat, he was widely admired among the French as American minister to Paris and was a major figure in the development of positive Franco-American relations. From 1775 to 1776, Franklin was Postmaster General under the Continental Congress and from 1785 to 1788 was President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. Toward the end of his life, he became one of the most prominent abolitionists.

    Franklin's colorful life and legacy of scientific and political achievement, and status as one of America's most influential Founding Fathers, has seen Franklin honored on coinage and money; warships; the names of many towns, counties, educational institutions, namesakes, and companies; and more than two centuries after his death, countless cultural references.

    Benjamin Franklin was born on Milk Street in Boston on January 17, 1706[2] and baptized at Old South Meeting House. His father, Josiah Franklin, was a tallow chandler, a maker of candles and soap, whose second wife, Abiah Folger, was Benjamin's mother. Josiah's marriages produced 17 children; Benjamin was the fifteenth child and youngest son. Josiah wanted Ben to attend school with the clergy but only had enough money to send him to school for two years. He attended Boston Latin School but did not graduate; he continued his education through voracious reading. Although "his parents talked of the church as a career" for Franklin, his schooling ended when he was ten. He then worked for his father for a time and at 12 he became an apprentice to his brother James, a printer. When Ben was 15, James created the New England Courant, the first truly independent newspaper in the colonies. When denied the option to write to the paper, Franklin invented the pseudonym of Mrs. Silence Dogood, who was ostensibly a middle-aged widow. The letters were published in the paper and became a subject of conversation around town. Neither James nor the Courant's readers were aware of the ruse, and James was unhappy with Ben when he discovered the popular correspondent was his younger brother. Franklin left his apprenticeship without permission and in so doing became a fugitive.[3]

    At age 17, Franklin ran away to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, seeking a new start in a new city. When he first arrived he worked in several printer shops around town. However, he was not satisfied by the immediate prospects. After a few months, while working in a printing house, Franklin was convinced by Pennsylvania Governor Sir William Keith to go to London, ostensibly to acquire the equipment necessary for establishing another newspaper in Philadelphia. Finding Keith's promises of backing a newspaper to be empty, Franklin worked as a compositor in a printer's shop in what is now the Church of St Bartholomew-the-Great in the Smithfield area of London. Following this, he returned to Philadelphia in 1726 with the help of a merchant named Thomas Denham, who gave Franklin a position as clerk, shopkeeper, and bookkeeper in Denham's merchant business.[3]

    In 1727, Benjamin Franklin, 21, created the Junto, a group of "like minded aspiring artisans and tradesmen who hoped to improve themselves while they improved their community." The Junto was a discussion group for issues of the day; it subsequently gave rise to many organizations in Philadelphia.

    Reading was a great pastime of the Junto, but books were rare and expensive. The members created a library, and initially pooled their own books together. This did not work, however, and Franklin initiated the idea of a subscription library, where the members pooled their monetary resources to buy books. This idea was the birth of the Library Company, with the charter of the Library Company of Philadelphia created in 1731 by Franklin.

    Originally, the books were kept in the homes of the first librarians, but in 1739 the collection was moved to the second floor of the State House of Pennsylvania, now known as Independence Hall. In 1791, a new building was built specifically for the library. The Library Company flourished with no competition and gained many priceless collections from bibliophiles such as James Logan and his physician brother William. The Library Company is now a great scholarly and research library with 500,000 rare books, pamphlets, and broadsides, more than 160,000 manuscripts, and 75,000 graphic items.

    Upon Denham's death, Franklin returned to his former trade. By 1730, Franklin had set up a printing house of his own and had contrived to become the publisher of a newspaper called The Pennsylvania Gazette. The Gazette gave Franklin a forum for agitation about a variety of local reforms and initiatives through printed essays and observations. Over time, his commentary, together with a great deal of savvy about cultivating a positive image of an industrious and intellectual young man, earned him a great deal of social respect; though even after Franklin had achieved fame as a scientist and statesman, he habitually signed his letters with the unpretentious 'B. Franklin, Printer.'[3]

    In 1731, Franklin was initiated into the local Freemason lodge, becoming a grand master in 1734, indicating his rapid rise to prominence in Pennsylvania.[4][5] That same year, he edited and published the first Masonic book in the Americas, a reprint of James Anderson's Constitutions of the Free-Masons. Franklin remained a Freemason throughout the rest of his life.[


    And of course there is so much more of his legacy that can be said.

    We can only hope the contributions of a mind like this will ever influence America again.
     
  7. bododie

    bododie Well-Known Member

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    Ben Franklin is a great choice for a mentor, but, for dinner? I'm much more insipid and would definitely go with Duane Allman. Good food, better music. Second choice: Alexander the Great.
     
  8. Here We Go

    Here We Go Well-Known Member

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    1. Edgar Cayce
    2. Nostradamus
     
  9. revolution4PAUL

    revolution4PAUL Well-Known Member

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    Jesus- I'm sure everyone would like to ask him some questions... Like whats the real reason why we are in Iraq.

    George Bush- So I could shoot him in the face after Jesus told me GWB motives.


    Oj Simpson- so i could get some tips on getting away with murder.


    RON PAUL- Just because he is the MAN..... DUHHH!!! lol


    peace
     
  10. Rhodri

    Rhodri Well-Known Member

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    What was I thinking! I'll go with Brigitte Bardot:p:p
     
  11. ilikeboobs

    ilikeboobs Well-Known Member

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    Up your butt, Jobu.
    George Washington - I'd warn him what we, in this generation, are doing to his great experiment so that he could make the constitution more clear for the morons who interpret it incorrectly.

    Jesus - give that man a high-five!

    Eve (of Adam & Eve fame) - I want to punch her in the nose and say, "don't talk to snakes, you stupid biatch!"
     
  12. revolution4PAUL

    revolution4PAUL Well-Known Member

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    ~LOL~ I love it.. That was hilarious!!!
     
  13. bododie

    bododie Well-Known Member

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    Which one? Adam or the other one? LOL.
     
  14. Vietvet

    Vietvet Well-Known Member

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    I'd invite Bill Buckley and FDR. I'd just sit there and listen to them debate political issues...:cool:
     
  15. Libsmasher

    Libsmasher Well-Known Member

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    Why? You wouldn't be able to understand the conversation. :D
     
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