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Citizenship?

Discussion in 'U.S. Politics' started by zerorelations, May 12, 2007.

  1. zerorelations

    zerorelations New Member

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    I heard this from someone and I want to hear what you guys think:

    "Pregnant illegal immigrants scamper across the Mexican border to unleash their spawn in this country so their offspring will be American citizens and will support their parents so they can stay.


    I propose changing the law so your PARENTS must have been born here in order for in order for you to be a citizen. Of course if your parents weren't born here but came here LEGALLY then you will also be a full citizen when you are born. This will take away allot of the assistance and incentive there is for illegals to come to this country. Their children will be illegal too, so they will not have full rights and opportunities guaranteed to U.S. citizens and therefore wont be able to support their parents and keep them in the country."
     
  2. Julsa

    Julsa New Member

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    What happened to the original idea of the melting pot, not just in one city but with the whole US? Why can't we welcome those that want to come? We in this country are all about climbing up the social and economic ladders, yet we can't give others the same opportunity we have? No one can choose where they were born. No one can choose their nationality. Why force them out instead of welcoming them in?

    You'd also have to make that law pretty complicated, because there are many people here that weren't born here but have still become citizens or residents. I think their children have every right to be called American citizens.

    I do think there should be some boundaries, but that's for another post.
     
  3. The_Giver

    The_Giver New Member

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    Well if businesses weren't allowed to exploit them then they wouldn't come here in the first place.
     
  4. Dave

    Dave New Member

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    If America announced that tomorrow there would be no more border patrols and anyone from Mexico was free to come into the country, within a week everyone that is able to run, walk or crawl would be across the border. I'm all for the melting pot of society, but we can't simply allow a free-for-all mass migration. There have to be laws in place for these kinds of things. If America is going to be an unwilling source of income for the Mexican economy we might as well annex the whole thing and call it America Jr.
     
  5. Dagoth

    Dagoth New Member

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    I strongly agree with Dave,but with one exception.
    I think the children of these "illegal immagrants" have the every right to reside residents in our nation as long as they are hardworking citizens and abide the rules~
    Otherwise I believe no more Mexicans legal or illegal should enter, because it would not be fair for every last soul.
    thus contradicting the first commendment of the bill of rights~
     
  6. The_Giver

    The_Giver New Member

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    For one America is a set of continents, but okay, I'll assume you are referring to the USA.

    Other than that, way to go Mr. I_make_broad_generalizations Dave Sir! You should consider taking an intro to economics and reading up on nationalism.
     
  7. Sgt Schultz

    Sgt Schultz New Member

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    If the economic and social conditions were improved in Mexico there wouldn't be a need for them to come to the US to try to survive.
     
  8. vyo476

    vyo476 Active Member

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    "America" is often used as shorthand for our country as well. This has roots near the American Revolution (notice the name) when the patriot forces of our nation wanted the name to reflect the whole continent - basically they were trying to drag Canada into it too, which didn't really pan out.

    I think Dave was exaggerating. No, not every single person in Mexico would come running into the US at once - but there'd be a lot, too many for the whole thing to be handled properly.
     
  9. Dagoth

    Dagoth New Member

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    I think I might conspire to vyo's side he sure knows how to talk the talk~
     
  10. Julsa

    Julsa New Member

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    Well, we can't change that. Look what happened the last time we tried to help a country?

    We CAN give them better lives here though, with some restriction.
     
  11. KeepOurFreedoms

    KeepOurFreedoms New Member

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    One city? Are you joking? Our whole country is a melting pot already. But why should we support another countries poor? Mexico is the 11th richest country in the world. Why don't the take care of their own? Why don't the poor that come here stay home and fight for their rights there instead of here?
     
  12. KeepOurFreedoms

    KeepOurFreedoms New Member

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    !!!!!
     
  13. Fonz

    Fonz New Member

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    Yep, this has nothing to do with anything but Racism.

    Mexicans are just the next group of people for dumb redneck Americans to place blame for all their problems on.


    There is no immigration problem.
     
  14. Julsa

    Julsa New Member

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    If you reread what I wrote, I described that it was not only one city anymore. NYC was considered the original melting pot, but the whole country has really become one.

    Why should we support other countries at all? If we're supporting one right now, why can't we support others? Why didn't Iraq take care of their own? Why didn't Iraq fight for their own rights?

    It's all the same. The government is hypocritical. We want to "help" (*cough*destroy*cough*) one country but not another?
     
  15. Coyote

    Coyote Active Member

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    Mexico Hosts Conference on Immigration Issues
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=10131854
    by Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

    Morning Edition, May 11, 2007 · Many of the Mexicans who leave their homeland for the United States come from the state of Michoacan. This week, hundreds of people with an interest in immigration issues — from representatives of migrant organizations to academics and politicians — gathered there for a conference on the issue. They came from all over Latin America, the U.S. and many parts of Europe and Africa.

    Workshops and panels tackled issues such as the social cost of migration, migrant rights and how to make hometown associations work

    Immigration is transforming societies everywhere, organizer Martina Guzman said.

    "Migration affects communities on every level — communities where migrants are from to the communities where the migrants are hosted," Guzman said.

    Interest in the conference was high enough that on the Monday before it began, registration was cut off.

    "We were over capacity," Guzman said. "I think is an amazing indication of how important this is globally."

    Immigration has exploded over the last 15 years.

    "You have a greater concentration of wealth in developed countries and also in developing countries in the cities," said Arnault Peral, a deputy representative of the United Nations Development Program in Mexico. "This phenomenon is a great engine to promote migration."

    Peral says that in the last 10 years globally remittances have doubled, meaning that more and more money is being sent by migrants to their families back home.

    The United States and Mexico are not the only places seeing immigration trends change. Europe, Asia and Africa have also been grappling with its effects.

    While the debate in the United States has focused on the influx of migrants, many of the participants here said that more attention is now being paid to the effects on the home country, especially Mexico.

    Roberto Garcia Zamorra, an immigration expert from Zacatecas University, predicted that Mexico will face a crisis unless it relies less on money from migrants.

    This is becoming a pressing issue because the U.S. economy is slowing in sectors that employ foreign labor, such as the construction industry.

    Money sent back to the homeland will decline, he said, adding: "If we don't make a new economic policy we are going to have a very big problem."

    For now, Mexico is exporting its people. Zamorra said a recent study showed that more than half the municipalities in 10 Mexican states are seeing population losses.

    Mexican politicians have been accused of hypocrisy by critics. They demand immigration reform for Mexicans in the U.S., while doing nothing to stop them from leaving Mexico in the first place.

    Lazaro Cardenas, the governor of Michoacan, gave a searing speech calling for a change in direction.

    "In Mexico, we not only see the migrant that emigrates as a family provider but also as a pillar of support to the national economy," Cardenas said, speaking in Spanish. "This is a road that goes nowhere — a mirage that has been used as an excuse for not assuming our responsibilities as a country regarding this massive exodus."

    His statement was met with rousing applause.

    The conference in Michoacan was designed to turn those ideas into action, not only in Mexico, but in other countries around the world.
     
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