Bloomberg Leaves Repubican Party

qalam

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He says he is not a candidate for Pres, is he waffling?

NEW YORK - New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg left the Republican Party on Tuesday and switched to unaffiliated, a move certain to be seen as a prelude to an independent presidential bid that would upend the 2008 race.

The billionaire former CEO, who was a lifelong Democrat before he switched to the Republican Party in 2001 for his first mayoral run, said the change in his voter registration does not mean he is running for president.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19317522/
 
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drippinhun

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Whatever the way the wind blows. Abandoning the Democrat Party to move into the then vogue GOP, now it's time to bail again. Such principles. And then you have muppet Arnold in the wings declaring, "Now is the time to bridge the differences between parties for the sake of America." Funny how pols follow the polls. And build a what? There is hardly a dime's difference now between the parties. What script do you recommend we follow Terminator? The neo-con globalist one that has been tearing down our nation for 25 years?
 

JavaBlack

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Whatever the way the wind blows. Abandoning the Democrat Party to move into the then vogue GOP, now it's time to bail again. Such principles.
Party loyalty is not a principle. Seems to me the Democrats didn't line up with his ideas. Turns out the Republicans didn't either.
It's not like he moved from being uber-liberal to uber-conservative to uber-centrist. And even if he did... sometimes we change philosophically with age and experience.

He seems like he's worthy to contend with the current crop of politicians... and he might be able to win my vote. I've heard he's done excellent things for education.
 

qalam

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This from today's politico.

--He's more likely to run than not, and is ready to spend big.

--He would be less likely to run if Sen. John McCain is the Republican nominee. That’s partly personal and partly practical: They’re friends, and they would draw from a similar swatch of voters.

--He would relish running if his predecessor, Rudolph Giuliani, is the nominee.

--Voters may be in the mood for a low-decibel, post-partisan alternative who stresses competence and moderation. His website says: "He is keeping New York's economy strong and its streets among the safest in the country. And in addition to continuing major initiatives in affordable housing, public health and education, he has launched a major anti-poverty campaign, developed a long-term plan for a sustainable, environmentally sound New York, and co-founded a bipartisan national coalition to fight against illegal guns.


http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0607/4564.html
 

top gun

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Party loyalty is not a principle. Seems to me the Democrats didn't line up with his ideas. Turns out the Republicans didn't either.
It's not like he moved from being uber-liberal to uber-conservative to uber-centrist. And even if he did... sometimes we change philosophically with age and experience.
QUOTE]

I agree with you. You make a very sound statement.

Much like Reagan said (OMG I'm quoting Ronald Reagan)... "I didn't leave the Democratic Party. They left me." The country and its political parties change and sometimes they change so much you may feel you have to switch.

The greatest example in history is Lincoln being a Whig Party Republican and his position against slavery. Move that to the present day and something like 90% of Blacks now vote Democrat. Times change... the basic planks of the political parties change... people sometimes have to change also.

Now if we could just find a way to trade Joe Leiberman for Chuck Hagel I'd be thrilled. :)
 
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drippinhun

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Party loyalty is not a principle. Seems to me the Democrats didn't line up with his ideas. Turns out the Republicans didn't either.
It's not like he moved from being uber-liberal to uber-conservative to uber-centrist. And even if he did... sometimes we change philosophically with age and experience.

He seems like he's worthy to contend with the current crop of politicians... and he might be able to win my vote. I've heard he's done excellent things for education.

I don't believe the Federal government should be involved in education other than setting criteria for graduate degrees and providing college loans for those whove given national service. Other than that, they should butt out. So that would be a black mark for Bloomberg in my book.

I believe he would be positive for two of my litmus concerns, first being the environment and the second - health care. But he would fail on my third critera, namely his immigration stance. My final tests would be moving off this globalization kick and getting away from blind support for Israel. I'm not sure of his position on those.
 
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