The Worst President in History?

vyo476

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Harrison was in office for like a month. He had barely moved into the White House.

And I disagree with you on Pierce. While he may have been an ineffective president, he didn't have the lasting long term effect on America like Buchanan and Johnson did. I'm sticking with those two.

Good point.
 
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Truth-Bringer

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My vote is for Woodrow Wilson - He gave us the Unholy Trinity of the Income Tax, the Federal Reserve, and an worldwide interventionist foreign policy.
 

USMC the Almighty

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My vote is for Woodrow Wilson - He gave us the Unholy Trinity of the Income Tax, the Federal Reserve, and an worldwide interventionist foreign policy.

But we reverted to a form of isolationism after WW1, so I think it's unfair to blame the interventionist policy on him.

And also, Lincoln used the income tax during the Civil War, but you're right, it didn't become an amendment until Wilson.
 

Truth-Bringer

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But we reverted to a form of isolationism after WW1, so I think it's unfair to blame the interventionist policy on him.

True, but I was mainly referring to the precedent he set for future presidents.

And also, Lincoln used the income tax during the Civil War, but you're right, it didn't become an amendment until Wilson.

Well, Lincoln is definitely on my "worst 3" list. I covered him earlier:

https://www.houseofpolitics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=639

I'd say Wilson is the worst, then FDR, then Lincoln. All three were authoritarians and collectivists who led us into unnecessary wars.

But Wilson's term was the most damaging because it laid the foundation for FDR's worst usurpations:

Wilson's War

How Woodrow Wilson's Great Blunder Led to Hitler, Lenin, Stalin, and World War II

Written by Jim Powell

History - United States - 20th Century Hardcover | March 2005
$ 27.50 | 1-4000-8236-6

About This Book

The fateful blunder that radically altered the course of the twentieth century—and led to some of the most murderous dictators in history

President Woodrow Wilson famously rallied the United States to enter World War I by saying the nation had a duty to make “the world safe for democracy.” But as historian Jim Powell demonstrates in this shocking reappraisal, Wilson actually made a horrible blunder by committing the United States to fight. Far from making the world safe for democracy, America’s entry into the war opened the door to murderous tyrants and Communist rulers. No other president has had a hand—however unintentional—in so much destruction. That’s why, Powell declares, “Wilson surely ranks as the worst president in American history.”

Wilson’s War reveals the horrifying consequences of our twenty-eighth president’s fateful decision to enter the fray in Europe. It led to millions of additional casualties in a war that had ground to a stalemate. And even more disturbing were the long-term consequences—consequences that played out well after Wilson’s death. Powell convincingly demonstrates that America’s armed forces enabled the Allies to win a decisive victory they would not otherwise have won—thus enabling them to impose the draconian surrender terms on Germany that paved the way for Adolf Hitler’s rise to power.

Powell also shows how Wilson’s naiveté and poor strategy allowed the Bolsheviks to seize power in Russia. Given a boost by Woodrow Wilson, Lenin embarked on a reign of terror that continued under Joseph Stalin. The result of Wilson’s blunder was seventy years of Soviet Communism, during which time the Communist government murdered some sixty million people.

Just as Powell’s FDR’s Folly exploded the myths about Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal, Wilson’s War destroys the conventional image of Woodrow Wilson as a great “progressive” who showed how the United States can do good by intervening in the affairs of other nations. Jim Powell delivers a stunning reminder that we should focus less on a president’s high-minded ideals and good intentions than on the consequences of his actions.

http://www.randomhouse.com/crown/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=1400082366
 

USMC the Almighty

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True, but I was mainly referring to the precedent he set for future presidents.

Fair enough...


Well, Lincoln is definitely on my "worst 3" list. I covered him earlier:

https://www.houseofpolitics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=639

I'd say Wilson is the worst, then FDR, then Lincoln. All three were authoritarians and collectivists who led us into unnecessary wars.

You could definitely make a pretty good argument for that. I'm no fan of Wilson or FDR, but despite Lincoln's horrific record on civil rights, I still support many of the decisions that Lincoln made for the preservation of the Union.

But Wilson's term was the most damaging because it laid the foundation for FDR's worst usurpations:

Absolutely agree.
 

invest07

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Worst Prez in US history?
No question in my mind that it was the peanut farmer. Under his leadership we experienced double digit inflation and double digit unemployment.
And the big Slick has #2 all wrapped up.
 

vyo476

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Worst Prez in US history?
No question in my mind that it was the peanut farmer. Under his leadership we experienced double digit inflation and double digit unemployment.
And the big Slick has #2 all wrapped up.

Jimmy was pretty bad. He tried something and it didn't work. Not only did it not work it it didn't work in a way that seriously hurt our economy. No complaints there.

But what about Bill Clinton? I mean, heaven forbid that the man got a little head on the side. But really, stop and ask yourself about that - if you were married to Hillary Clinton wouldn't you be looking for "a little something on the side?"
 

USMC the Almighty

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Lincoln, FDR, Wilson would be my top three, in that order. Truman definately would be in the top 5 for firing the general who won him the Korean war.

It's interesting that someone named States Rights would chose FDR, Wilson, and especially Lincoln as their top three.
 
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